Items in AFP with MESH term: Laparoscopy

Fibroids (Uterine Myomatosis, Leiomyomas). - Clinical Evidence Handbook


Medical Management vs. Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease - Cochrane for Clinicians


Surgical Options in the Management of Groin Hernias - Article

ABSTRACT: Inguinal and femoral hernias are the most common conditions for which primary care physicians refer patients for surgical management. Hernias usually present as swelling accompanied by pain or a dragging sensation in the groin. Most hernias can be diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination, but ultrasonography may be useful in differentiating a hernia from other causes of groin swelling. Surgical repair is usually advised because of the danger of incarceration and strangulation, particularly with femoral hernias. Three major types of open repair are currently used, and laparoscopic techniques are also employed. The choice of technique depends on several factors, including the type of hernia, anesthetic considerations, cost, period of postoperative disability and the surgeon's expertise. Following initial herniorrhaphy, complication and recurrence rates are generally low. Laparoscopic techniques make it possible for patients to return to normal activities more quickly, but they are more costly than open procedures. In addition, they require general anesthesia, and the long-term hernia recurrence rate with these procedures is unknown.


Surgical Options in the Management of Groin Hernias - Article

ABSTRACT: Inguinal and femoral hernias are the most common conditions for which primary care physicians refer patients for surgical management. Hernias usually present as swelling accompanied by pain or a dragging sensation in the groin. Most hernias can be diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination, but ultrasonography may be useful in differentiating a hernia from other causes of groin swelling. Surgical repair is usually advised because of the danger of incarceration and strangulation, particularly with femoral hernias. Three major types of open repair are currently used, and laparoscopic techniques are also employed. The choice of technique depends on several factors, including the type of hernia, anesthetic considerations, cost, period of postoperative disability and the surgeon's expertise. Following initial herniorrhaphy, complication and recurrence rates are generally low. Laparoscopic techniques make it possible for patients to return to normal activities more quickly, but they are more costly than open procedures. In addition, they require general anesthesia, and the long-term hernia recurrence rate with these procedures is unknown.


Complications of Adjustable Gastric Banding Surgery for Obesity - Article

ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding procedures have a favorable risk-benefit profile and are increasingly important as part of the overall management of obesity. These procedures are effective at inducing weight loss and improving comorbid conditions, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and sleep apnea. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding has several typical complications, and family physicians should recognize these as part of a team-based approach to the management of obesity. Gastric band slippage, port or tubing malfunction, stomal obstruction, band erosion, pouch dilation, and port infection are examples of complications that may occur after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Upper gastrointestinal tract imaging is often required to diagnose these complications. Some complications can be managed in the primary care setting through behavioral diet modification or removal of fluid from the band (band deflation); however, other complications require surgical repair or removal of the band.



Information From Industry