Items in AFP with MESH term: Pituitary Neoplasms

Diagnosis and Management of Galactorrhea - Article

ABSTRACT: After infancy, galactorrhea usually is medication-induced. The most common pathologic cause of galactorrhea is a pituitary tumor. Other causes include hypothalamic and pituitary stalk lesions, neurogenic stimulation, thyroid disorders, and chronic renal failure. Patients with the latter conditions may have irregular menses, infertility, and osteopenia or osteoporosis if they have associated hyperprolactinemia. Tests for pregnancy, serum prolactin level and serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level, and magnetic resonance imaging are important diagnostic tools that should be employed when clinically indicated. The underlying cause of galactorrhea should be treated when possible. The decision to treat patients with galactorrhea is based on the serum prolactin level, the severity of galactorrhea, and the patient's fertility desires. Dopamine agonists are the treatment of choice in most patients with hyperprolactinemic disorders. Bromocriptine is the preferred agent for treatment of hyperprolactin-induced anovulatory infertility. Although cabergoline is more effective and better tolerated than bromocriptine, it is more expensive, and treatment must be discontinued one month before conception is attempted. Surgical resection rarely is required for prolactinomas.


"My Rings Won't Fit Anymore" - Photo Quiz


Cushing's Disease: Clinical Manifestations and Diagnostic Evaluation - Article

ABSTRACT: The most common endogenous cause of Cushing's syndrome is Cushing's disease. Frequent clinical findings include weight gain, truncal obesity, striae, hypertension, glucose intolerance and infections. Cranial nerve II may be affected by enlarging pituitary adenomas in Cushing's disease; cranial nerves III, IV and VI may also be affected. The evaluation of patients with suspected Cushing's disease and syndrome requires an understanding of the proper use and limitations of the tests commonly included in the diagnostic work-up. The best screening test for Cushing's syndrome is a 24-hour urine collection with analysis for urinary free cortisol excretion. Low-dose and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests, corticotropin assays, a corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test and inferior petrosal sinus catheterization may be required for a definitive diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in localizing the lesion. Surgical removal of the lesion by a transphenoidal approach is usually successful, but long-term follow-up is required. Some patients require lifetime glucocorticoid replacement therapy.


Pituitary Adenomas: An Overview - Article

ABSTRACT: Prolactinomas and nonfunctioning adenomas are the most common types of pituitary adenomas. Patients with pituitary adenomas may present initially with symptoms of endocrine dysfunction such as infertility, decreased libido, and galactorrhea, or with neurologic symptoms such as headache and visual changes. The diagnosis may also be made following imaging done for an unrelated issue in an asymptomatic patient; this is termed a pituitary incidentaloma. Oversecretion of hormones from a dysfunctional pituitary gland may result in classic clinical syndromes, the most common of which are hyperprolactinemia (from oversecretion of prolactin), acromegaly (from excess growth hormone), and Cushing disease (from overproduction of adrenocorticotropic hormone). In the diagnostic approach to a suspected pituitary adenoma, it is important to evaluate complete pituitary function, because hypopituitarism is common. Therapy for pituitary adenomas depends on the specific type of tumor, and should be managed with a team approach to include endocrinology and neurosurgery when indicated. Dopamine agonists are the primary treatment for prolactinomas. Small nonfunctioning adenomas and prolactinomas in asymptomatic patients do not require immediate intervention and can be observed.



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