Items in AFP with MESH term: Pregnancy Outcome

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Caregiver Support for Women During Childbirth: Does the Presence of a Labor-Support Person Affect Maternal-Child Outcomes? - Cochrane for Clinicians


VBAC: Protecting Patients, Defending Doctors - Editorials


Intensive Management of Gestational Diabetes - Cochrane for Clinicians


Effects of Discontinuing Epidurals in Late Labor - Cochrane for Clinicians


A Pregnant Patient with Dyspnea - Photo Quiz


Antiviral Agents for Pregnant Women with Genital Herpes - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Instruments for Assisted Vaginal Delivery - Cochrane for Clinicians


Effects of Exercise on Pregnancy - Editorials


Common Questions About Late-Term and Postterm Pregnancy - Article

ABSTRACT: Pregnancy is considered late term from 41 weeks, 0 days’ to 41 weeks, 6 days’ gestation, and postterm at 42 weeks’ gestation. Early dating of the pregnancy is important for accurately determining when a pregnancy is late- or postterm, and first-trimester ultrasonography should be performed if clinical dating is uncertain. Optimal management of a low-risk, late-term pregnancy should consider maternal preference and balance the benefits and risks of induction vs. waiting for spontaneous labor. Compared with expectant management, induction at 41 weeks’ gestation is associated with a small absolute decrease in perinatal mortality and decreases in other fetal and maternal risks without an increased risk of cesarean delivery. Although there is no clear evidence that antenatal testing beginning at 41 weeks’ gestation prevents intrauterine fetal demise, it is often performed because the risks are low. When expectant management is chosen, most experts recommend beginning twice-weekly antenatal surveillance at 41 weeks with biophysical profile or nonstress testing plus amniotic fluid index (modified biophysical profile); induction may be deferred until 42 weeks if this surveillance is reassuring.


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