Items in AFP with MESH term: Premenstrual Syndrome

Diagnosis and Treatment of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder - Article

ABSTRACT: From 2 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age have severe distress and dysfunction caused by premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a severe form of premenstrual syndrome. Current research implicates mechanisms of serotonin as relevant to etiology and treatment. Patients with mild to moderate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome may benefit from nonpharmacologic interventions such as education about the disorder, lifestyle changes, and nutritional adjustments. However, patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder and those who fail to respond to more conservative measures may also require pharmacologic management, typically beginning with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. This drug class seems to reduce emotional, cognitive-behavioral, and physical symptoms, and improve psychosocial functioning. Serotoninergic antidepressants such as fluoxetine, citalopram, sertraline, and clomipramine are effective when used intermittently during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Treatment strategies specific to the luteal phase may reduce cost, long-term side effects, and risk of discontinuation syndrome. Patients who do not respond to a serotoninergic antidepressant may be treated with another selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Low-dose alprazolam, administered intermittently during the luteal phase, may be considered as a second-line treatment. A therapeutic trial with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or danazol may be considered when other treatments are ineffective. However, the risk of serious side effects and the cost of these medications limit their use to short periods.


Premenstrual Syndrome - Article

ABSTRACT: Premenstrual syndrome, a common cyclic disorder of young and middle-aged women, is characterized by emotional and physical symptoms that consistently occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Women with more severe affective symptoms are classified as having premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Although the etiology of these disorders remains uncertain, research suggests that altered regulation of neurohormones and neurotransmitters is involved. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder are diagnoses of exclusion; therefore, alternative explanations for symptoms must be considered before either diagnosis is made. The disorders can manifest with a wide variety of symptoms, including depression, mood lability, abdominal pain, breast tenderness, headache, and fatigue. Women with mild symptoms should be instructed about lifestyle changes, including healthy diet, sodium and caffeine restriction, exercise, and stress reduction. Supportive strategies, such as use of a symptom diary, may be helpful in diagnosing and managing the disorders. In women with moderate symptoms, treatment includes both medication and lifestyle modifications. Dietary supplements, such as calcium and evening primrose oil, may offer modest benefit. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine and sertraline are the most effective pharmacologic agents. Prostaglandin inhibitors and diuretics may provide some relief of symptoms. Only weak evidence supports the effectiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, androgenic agents, estrogen, progesterone, or other psychotropics, and side effects limit their use.


Treatment Strategies for Premenstrual Syndrome - Article

ABSTRACT: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to a group of menstrually related disorders. Premenstrual symptoms sufficient to impair daily activity and relationships are estimated to occur in up to 40 percent of women of reproductive age, with 5 percent of these women having severe impairment. Although no single causative factor has been identified, PMS is related to ovulatory cycles and resolves at menopause. A specific diagnostic test for PMS does not exist. Treatment is based on the symptoms. Oral contraceptive agents, diuretics and antidepressants have been used successfully to relieve symptoms. Cognitive therapy may help the patient develop appropriate ways to cope with the obstacles, frustrations and discomforts of daily life. Although dietary deficiencies may be difficult to demonstrate, nutritional supplementation may result in significant improvement. Various treatments, including progesterone supplementation, vitamin B6 in high doses, alprazolam and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, are generally not recommended. A comprehensive treatment plan that encourages a healthy lifestyle may relieve symptoms in most women.


Depression in Women: Diagnostic and Treatment Considerations - Article

ABSTRACT: Women experience depression twice as often as men. The diagnostic criteria for depression are the same for both sexes, but women with depression more frequently experience guilt, anxiety, increased appetite and sleep, weight gain and comorbid eating disorders. Women may achieve higher plasma concentrations of antidepressants and thus may require lower dosages of these medications. Depending on the patient's age, the potential effects of antidepressants on a fetus or neonate may need to be considered. Research indicates no increased teratogenic risk from in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants. SSRIs are effective in treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder and many comorbid conditions associated with depression in women. Psychotherapy may be used alone in women with mild to moderate depression, or it may be used adjunctively with antidepressant drug therapy. Women who have severe depression accompanied by active suicidal thoughts or plans should usually be managed in conjunction with a psychiatrist.


Evening Primrose Oil - Article

ABSTRACT: Evening primrose oil (Oenothera biennis) is a commonly used alternative therapy and a rich source of omega-6 essential fatty acids. It is best known for its use in the treatment of systemic diseases marked by chronic inflammation, such as atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. It is often used for several women's health conditions, including breast pain (mastalgia), menopausal and premenstrual symptoms, cervical ripening, and labor induction or augmentation. However, there is insufficient evidence to make a reliable assessment of its effectiveness for most clinical indications. The current evidence suggests that oral evening primrose oil does not provide clinically significant improvement in persons with atopic dermatitis, and that it is also likely ineffective for the treatment of cyclical mastalgia and premenstrual syndrome. However, most trials to date have significant methodologic flaws and must be considered preliminary. The use of evening primrose oil during pregnancy is not supported in the literature and should be avoided. Evening primrose oil is generally well tolerated, with reported minor adverse effects, including gastrointestinal upset and headaches. Optimal dosing standards and treatment regimens await clarification in adequately powered clinical trials.


Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder - Article

ABSTRACT: Premenstrual syndrome is defined as recurrent moderate psychological and physical symptoms that occur during the luteal phase of menses and resolve with menstruation. It affects 20 to 32 percent of premenopausal women. Women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder experience affective or somatic symptoms that cause severe dysfunction in social or occupational realms. The disorder affects 3 to 8 percent of premenopausal women. Proposed etiologies include increased sensitivity to normal cycling levels of estrogen and progesterone, increased aldosterone and plasma renin activity, and neurotransmitter abnormalities, particularly serotonin. The Daily Record of Severity of Problems is one tool with which women may self-report the presence and severity of premenstrual symptoms that correlate with the criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., text revision. Symptom relief is the goal for treatment of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. There is limited evidence to support the use of calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin B6 supplementation, and insufficient evidence to support cognitive behavior therapy. Serotonergic antidepressants (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine) are first-line pharmacologic therapy.



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