Items in AFP with MESH term: Primary Health Care

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Evaluation and Treatment of the Acutely Injured Worker - Article

ABSTRACT: Approximately 3 million work-related injuries were reported by private industries in 2011, and primary care physicians provided care for approximately one out of four injured workers. To appropriately individualize the treatment of an injured worker and expedite the return to work process, primary care physicians need to be familiar with the workers’ compensation system and treatment guidelines. Caring for an injured worker begins with a medical history documenting preexisting medical conditions, use of potentially impairing medications and substances, baseline functional status, and psychosocial factors. An understanding of past and current work tasks is critical and can be obtained through patient-completed forms, job analyses, and the patient’s employer. Return to work in some capacity is an important part of the recovery process. It should not be unnecessarily delayed and should be an expected outcome communicated to the patient during the initial visit. Certain medications, such as opioids, may delay the return to work process, and their use should be carefully considered. Accurate and legible documentation is critical and should always include the location, date, time, and mechanism of injury.


Ecology of Health Care: The Need to Address Low Utilization in American Indians/Alaska Natives - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers


Projected Impact of the Primary Care Residency Expansion Program Using Historical Trends in Graduate Placement - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers


The Changing Landscape of Primary Care HPSAs and the Influence on Practice Location - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers


Leukemia: An Overview for Primary Care - Article

ABSTRACT: Leukemia is a clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. The four broad subtypes most likely to be encountered by primary care physicians are acute lymphoblastic, acute myelogenous, chronic lymphocytic, and chronic myelogenous. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs more often in children, whereas the other subtypes are more common in adults. Risk factors include a genetic predisposition as well as environmental factors, such as exposure to ionizing radiation. Symptoms are nonspecific and include fever, fatigue, weight loss, bone pain, bruising, or bleeding. A complete blood count usually reveals leukocytosis and other abnormally elevated or depressed cell lines. Patients with suspected leukemia should be referred promptly to a hematologist-oncologist. The diagnosis is confirmed by further examination of the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Treatment may include chemotherapy, radiation, monoclonal antibodies, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Complications of treatment include tumor lysis syndrome and serious infections from immunosuppression. Leukemia survivors should be monitored closely for secondary malignancies, cardiac complications, and endocrine disturbances such as metabolic syndrome, hypothyroidism, and hypogonadism. Five-year survival rates are highest in younger patients and in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.


Podcasts of the POEMs Featured in AFP Are Now Available - Editorials


When Medicine Reverses Itself: Avoiding Practice Pitfalls - Editorials


Screening and Behavioral Counseling Interventions in Primary Care to Reduce Alcohol Misuse - Putting Prevention into Practice


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