Items in AFP with MESH term: Primary Prevention

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AHA Examines Cardiovascular Problems in Diabetes - Practice Guidelines


Screening for Colorectal Cancer - Putting Prevention into Practice


Lightening the Lead Load in Children - Article

ABSTRACT: More than 4 percent of preschool-aged children in the United States have blood lead levels above 10 microg per dL (0.50 pmol per L), and these levels have been associated with a decline in IQ. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advocates the use of a screening questionnaire to identify lead exposure or toxicity in all children. Primary prevention through the removal of lead from gasoline and paint has led to a reduction of blood lead levels in children. Secondary prevention through paint hazard remediation is effective in homes that have a high lead burden. Children with lead levels of 45 to 69 microg per dL (2.15 to 3.35 pmol per L) should receive chelation therapy using succimer (DMSA) or edetate calcium disodium (CaNa2EDTA). Use of both CaNa2EDTA and dimercaprol (BAL in oil) is indicated in children with blood lead levels higher than 70 microg per dL (3.40 micromol per L). Current treatment recommendations are based on the reduction of blood lead levels, which may not represent a significant overall reduction of the lead burden. Clinical trials of existing agents are needed to determine patient-oriented outcomes, such as the effect on IQ.


Newsletter - AAFP News: AFP Edition


The Importance of Primary Care Physicians as the Usual Source of Healthcare in the Achievement of Prevention Goals - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers


Prevention and Early Detection of Malignant Melanoma - Article

ABSTRACT: In addressing the problem of malignant melanoma, family physicians should emphasize primary prevention. This includes educating patients about the importance of avoiding excessive sun exposure and preventing sunburns, and advising them about the importance of prompt self-referral for changing nevi. Family physicians should be able to perform an overall risk assessment for melanoma, particularly to identify persons with familial atypical mole syndrome. Patients with such high risk should be strongly considered for referral for dermatologic surveillance. Because there are no systematic studies in primary care populations, there are no data on which to base recommendations for periodic screening in this setting. However, when performing any part of the physical examination, family physicians should be alert for suspicious nevi. Nevi detected by the family physician or pointed out by the patient should be subject to excisional biopsy with accepted techniques or be referred for such a procedure.


Finding Success in a Capitated Environment - Feature


Making Wellness Medicine Work - Feature


Pre-employment Examinations for Preventing Occupational Injury and Disease - Cochrane for Clinicians


Menopausal Hormone Therapy for the Primary Prevention of Chronic Conditions - Putting Prevention into Practice


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