Items in AFP with MESH term: Rape

Management of Female Sexual Assault - Article

ABSTRACT: A sexual assault occurs once every 6.4 minutes in the United States. One in every six women will be raped during her lifetime. Although a woman is four times more likely to be assaulted by someone she knows than by someone she does not know, the majority of these crimes go unreported even though rape is a felony. The purpose of the medical examination after a sexual assault is to assess the patient for physical injuries and to collect evidence for forensic evaluation and possible legal proceedings. Laboratory samples should be obtained at the initial visit and should include testing for pregnancy, syphilis, hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Treatment should address physical injuries, pregnancy prophylaxis, sexually transmitted diseases and psychosocial sequelae. Appropriate referral services should be initiated during the initial visit. Victims of sexual assault require appropriate care, follow-up and information regarding their legal rights. Family physicians should be familiar with the state laws governing collection of evidence and should be prepared to advise the patient to report the crime. The history should be confined to medically relevant facts and should be conducted in a safe and quiet environment.


Isn't This Statutory Rape? - Curbside Consultation


Sexual Assault of Women - Article

ABSTRACT: Sexual violence affects up to one third of women during their lifetime. Sexual assault is underreported, and more than one half of assaults are committed by someone known to the survivor. Although both men and women can be sexually assaulted, women are at greatest risk. Some groups are more vulnerable, including adolescents; survivors of childhood sexual or physical abuse; persons who are disabled; persons with substance abuse problems; sex workers; persons who are poor or homeless; and persons living in prisons, institutions, or areas of military conflict. Family physicians care for sexual assault survivors immediately and years after the assault. Immediate care includes the treatment of injuries, prophylaxis for sexually transmitted infections, administration of emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy, and the sensitive management of psychological issues. Family physicians should collect evidence for a “rape kit” only if they are experienced in treating persons who have been sexually assaulted because of the legal ramifications of improper collection and storage of evidence. Sexual assault may result in long-term mental and physical health problems. Presentations to the family physician may include self-destructive behaviors, chronic pelvic pain, and difficulty with pelvic examinations. Prevention of sexual assault is societal and should focus on public health education. Safety and support programs have been shown to reduce sexual assaults.


CDC Releases the 1998 Guidelines for the Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Special Medical Reports


'Don't Scream, Miss Annie. Don't Scream'. - Resident and Student Voice


ACOG Releases a Statement on Identification and Treatment of Adolescent Victims of Sexual Assault - Special Medical Reports



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