Items in AFP with MESH term: Self Care

Pages: 1 2 Next

Supporting Self-management in Patients with Chronic Illness - Article

ABSTRACT: Support of patient self-management is a key component of effective chronic illness care and improved patient outcomes. Self-management support goes beyond traditional knowledge-based patient education to include processes that develop patient problem-solving skills, improve self-efficacy, and support application of knowledge in real-life situations that matter to patients. This approach also encompasses system-focused changes in the primary care environment. Family physicians can support patient self-management by structuring patient-physician interactions to identify problems from the patient perspective, making office environment changes that remove self-management barriers, and providing education individually and through available community self-management resources. The emerging evidence supports the implementation of practice strategies that are conducive to patient self-management and improved patient outcomes among chronically ill patients.


13 Months of Quality Improvement: Did It Work? - Improving Patient Care


Billing Medicare for Diabetes Self-Management Training - Getting Paid


How to Cope if You Feel Attracted to a Patient - Balancing Act


Should You Treat Yourself, Family or Friends? - Feature


Planned Visits to Help Patients Self-manage Chronic Conditions - Editorials


Nonmedical Ultrasonography During Pregnancy - Curbside Consultation


Five Communication Strategies to Promote Self-Management of Chronic Illness - Feature


Key Practice Points in the Management of Fibromyalgia - Editorials


Pulmonary Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Pulmonary rehabilitation is a nonpharmacologic therapy that has emerged as a standard of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, patient-centered intervention that includes patient assessment, exercise training, self-management education, and psychosocial support. In the United States, pulmonary rehabilitation is usually given in outpatient, hospital-based programs lasting six to 12 weeks. Positive outcomes from pulmonary rehabilitation include increased exercise tolerance, reduced dyspnea and anxiety, increased self-efficacy, and improvement in health-related quality of life. Hospital admissions after exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are also reduced with this intervention. The positive outcomes associated with pulmonary rehabilitation are realized without demonstrable improvements in lung function. This paradox is explained by the fact that pulmonary rehabilitation identifies and treats the systemic effects of the disease. This intervention should be considered in patients who remain symptomatic or have decreased functional status despite optimal medical management. Medicare now covers up to 36 sessions of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with moderate, severe, and very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.


Pages: 1 2 Next


Information From Industry