Items in AFP with MESH term: Sexually Transmitted Diseases

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Evaluating the Child for Sexual Abuse - Article

ABSTRACT: Child victims of sexual abuse may present with physical findings that can include anogenital problems, enuresis or encopresis. Behavioral changes may involve sexual acting out, aggression, depression, eating disturbances and regression. Because the examination findings of most child victims of sexual abuse are within normal limits or are nonspecific, the child's statements are extremely important. The child's history as obtained by the physician may be admitted as evidence in court trials; therefore, complete documentation of questions and answers is critical. A careful history should be obtained and a thorough physical examination should be performed with documentation of all findings. When examining the child's genitalia, it is important that the physician be familiar with normal variants, non-specific changes and diagnostic signs of sexual abuse. Judicious use of laboratory tests, along with appropriate therapy, should be individually tailored. Forensic evidence collection is indicated in certain cases. Referral for psychologic services is important because victims of abuse are more likely to have depression, anxiety disorders, behavioral problems and post-traumatic stress disorder.


Evaluation and Treatment of Hematospermia - Article

ABSTRACT: Hematospermia can be a distressing symptom for patients, but most cases are effectively managed by a primary care physician. Although the condition is usually benign, significant underlying pathology must be excluded by history, physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and, in select cases, other diagnostic modalities. In men younger than 40 years without risk factors (e.g., history of cancer, known urogenital malformation, bleeding disorders) and in men with no associated symptoms, hematospermia is often self-limited and requires no further evaluation or treatment other than patient reassurance. Many cases are attributable to sexually transmitted infections or other urogenital infections in men younger than 40 years who present with hematospermia associated with lower urinary tract symptoms. Workup in these patients can be limited to urinalysis and testing for sexually transmitted infections, with treatment as indicated. In men 40 years and older, iatrogenic hematospermia from urogenital instrumentation or prostate biopsy is the most common cause of blood in the semen. However, recurrent or persistent hematospermia or associated symptoms (e.g., fever, chills, weight loss, bone pain) should prompt further investigation, starting with a prostate examination and prostate-specific antigen testing to evaluate for prostate cancer. Other etiologies to consider in those 40 years and older include genitourinary infections, inflammations, vascular malformations, stones, tumors, and systemic disorders that increase bleeding risk.


Sexually Transmitted Disease: A Private Matter? - Curbside Consultation


CDC Releases 2002 Guidelines for Treating STDs: Part I. Diseases Characterized by Vaginal Discharge and PID - Practice Guidelines


Advance Provision for Emergency Oral Contraception - Cochrane for Clinicians


Sexual Assault of Women - Article

ABSTRACT: Sexual violence affects up to one third of women during their lifetime. Sexual assault is underreported, and more than one half of assaults are committed by someone known to the survivor. Although both men and women can be sexually assaulted, women are at greatest risk. Some groups are more vulnerable, including adolescents; survivors of childhood sexual or physical abuse; persons who are disabled; persons with substance abuse problems; sex workers; persons who are poor or homeless; and persons living in prisons, institutions, or areas of military conflict. Family physicians care for sexual assault survivors immediately and years after the assault. Immediate care includes the treatment of injuries, prophylaxis for sexually transmitted infections, administration of emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy, and the sensitive management of psychological issues. Family physicians should collect evidence for a “rape kit” only if they are experienced in treating persons who have been sexually assaulted because of the legal ramifications of improper collection and storage of evidence. Sexual assault may result in long-term mental and physical health problems. Presentations to the family physician may include self-destructive behaviors, chronic pelvic pain, and difficulty with pelvic examinations. Prevention of sexual assault is societal and should focus on public health education. Safety and support programs have been shown to reduce sexual assaults.


Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections: Recommendation Statement - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


Human Papillomavirus: Clinical Manifestations and Prevention - Article

ABSTRACT: Human papillomaviruses cause the most common sexually trans- mitted infection in the world and are responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Genital human papillomavirus infection can be divided into low-risk infections (causing genital warts) and high-risk infections (causing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and cervical and other cancers). Exposure to human papilloma- virus typically produces a sexually transmitted infection that may progress to a clinically apparent process, such as genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions of the lower genital tract. Although most human papillomavirus infections resolve spontane- ously within two years, some high-risk infections persist and are considered cancer precursors. Risk factors for persistent infection include multiple sex partners, sex at an early age, history of sexually transmitted infections, and smoking. Condom use is only partially protective against human papillomavirus infection. The two human papillomavirus vaccines are most effective if given to girls before the onset of sexual activity.


CDC Releases the 1998 Guidelines for the Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases - Special Medical Reports


A Troubled Teen: Matters of Confidentiality - Curbside Consultation


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