Items in AFP with MESH term: Skin Diseases

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Vulvodynia and Vulvar Vestibulitis: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Vulvodynia is a problem most family physicians can expect to encounter. It is a syndrome of unexplained vulvar pain, frequently accompanied by physical disabilities, limitation of daily activities, sexual dysfunction and psychologic distress. The patient's vulvar pain usually has an acute onset and, in most cases, becomes a chronic problem lasting months to years. The pain is often described as burning or stinging, or a feeling of rawness or irritation. Vulvodynia may have multiple causes, with several subsets, including cyclic vulvovaginitis, vulvar vestibulitis syndrome, essential (dysesthetic) vulvodynia and vulvar dermatoses. Evaluation should include a thorough history and physical examination as well as cultures for bacteria and fungus, KOH microscopic examination and biopsy of any suspicious areas. Proper treatment mandates that the correct type of vulvodynia be identified. Depending on the specific diagnosis, treatment may include fluconazole, calcium citrate, tricyclic antidepressants, topical corticosteroids, physical therapy with biofeedback, surgery or laser therapy. Since vulvodynia is often a chronic condition, regular medical follow-up and referral to a support group are helpful for most patients.


Recognizing Neoplastic Skin Lesions: A Photo Guide - Article

ABSTRACT: Malignant lesions of the skin are common. Patients who develop squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma often have recognizable precursor conditions. A few skin lesions resemble malignancies. Lesions that are growing, spreading or pigmented, or those that occur on exposed areas of skin are of particular concern. Knowing the similarities and differences between these lesions allows the primary physician to make a diagnosis in most cases by simple inspection and palpation. When in doubt, it is appropriate to perform an excisional biopsy of small lesions or punch biopsy of larger lesions. Removal of premalignant lesions will reduce the occurrence of malignant disease. Almost all skin cancers can be cured by early excision or destruction. For these reasons, physicians should be aware of the risk factors for skin cancer, educate patients about risk reduction and include skin inspection for premalignant and malignant lesions as a part of routine health maintenance examinations.


Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Benign Dermatoses - Article

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, also known as mycosis fungoides, is a malignancy of the T helper (CD4+) cells. Diagnosis is difficult early in the course of this disease because it mimics several benign skin disorders, including eczema, psoriasis and contact dermatitis. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is also difficult to identify histologically, and multiple biopsies may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment may require a combination of topical and systemic agents. Patients with limited skin disease have a good prognosis, but the prognosis is less hopeful in those with extracutaneous involvement. As the disease progresses, the normal T-cell population is eliminated, and the patient becomes significantly immunosuppressed. Infection is the primary cause of mortality in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.


Neurotic Excoriations - Article

ABSTRACT: Neurotic excoriations are self-inflicted skin lesions produced by repetitive scratching. Because there is no known physical problem of the skin, this is a physical manifestation of an emotional problem. The classic lesions are characterized by clean, linear erosions, scabs and scars that can be hypopigmented or hyperpigmented. The lesions are usually similar in size and shape, and are grouped on easily accessible and exposed body sites, such as extensor surfaces of the extremities, face and upper back. Psychotropic medications and appropriate counseling can be effective treatments.


Erythematosus Annular Lesions - Photo Quiz


Painful Plaques Shortly After Hospital Discharge - Photo Quiz


Food Allergies: Detection and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Family physicians play a central role in the suspicion and diagnosis of immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergies, but they are also critical in redirecting the evaluation for symptoms that patients are falsely attributing to allergies. Although any food is a potential allergen, more than 90 percent of acute systemic reactions to food in children are from eggs, milk, soy, wheat, or peanuts, and in adults are from crustaceans, tree nuts, peanuts, or fish. The oral allergy syndrome is more common than anaphylactic reactions to food, but symptoms are transient and limited to the mouth and throat. Skin-prick and radioallergosorbent tests for particular foods have about an 85 percent sensitivity and 30 to 60 percent specificity. Intradermal testing has a higher false-positive rate and greater risk of adverse reactions; therefore, it should not be used for initial evaluations. The double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge remains the most specific test for confirming diagnosis. Treatment is through recognition and avoidance of the responsible food. Patients with anaphylactic reactions need emergent epinephrine and instruction in self-administration in the event of inadvertent exposure. Antihistamines can be used for more minor reactions.


Dermoscopy: An Invaluable Tool for Evaluating Skin Lesions - Editorials


Rash at the Site of a Tattoo - Photo Quiz


Progressive Skin Fibrosis - Photo Quiz


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