Items in AFP with MESH term: Tinea

Topical Treatment of Common Superficial Tinea Infections - Article

ABSTRACT: Tinea infections are superficial fungal infections caused by three species of fungi collectively known as dermatophytes. Commonly these infections are named for the body part affected, including tinea corporis (general skin), tinea cruris (groin), and tinea pedis (feet). Accurate diagnosis is necessary for effective treatment. Diagnosis is usually based on history and clinical appearance plus direct microscopy of a potassium hydroxide preparation. Culture or histologic examination is rarely required for diagnosis. Treatment requires attention to exacerbating factors such as skin moisture and choosing an appropriate antifungal agent. Topical therapy is generally successful unless the infection covers an extensive area or is resistant to initial therapy. In these cases, systemic therapy may be required. Tinea corporis and cruris infections are usually treated for two weeks, while tinea pedis is treated for four weeks with an azole or for one to two weeks with allylamine medication. Treatment should continue for at least one week after clinical clearing of infection. Newer medications require fewer applications and a shorter duration of use. The presence of inflammation may necessitate the use of an agent with inherent anti-inflammatory properties or the use of a combination antifungal/steroid agent. The latter agents should be used with caution because of their potential for causing atrophy and other steroid-associated complications.


Common Tinea Infections in Children - Article

ABSTRACT: The common dermatophyte genera Trichophyton, Microsporum, and Epidermophyton are major causes of superficial fungal infections in children. These infections (e.g., tinea corporis, pedis, cruris, and unguium) are typically acquired directly from contact with infected humans or animals or indirectly from exposure to contaminated soil or fomites. A diagnosis usually can be made with a focused history, physical examination, and potassium hydroxide microscopy. Occasionally, Wood's lamp examination, fungal culture, or histologic tissue examination is required. Most tinea infections can be managed with topical therapies; oral treatment is reserved for tinea capitis, severe tinea pedis, and tinea unguium. Topical therapy with fungicidal allylamines may have slightly higher cure rates and shorter treatment courses than with fungistatic azoles. Although oral griseofulvin has been the standard treatment for tinea capitis, newer oral antifungal agents such as terbinafine, itraconazole, and fluconazole are effective, safe, and have shorter treatment courses.


Diagnosis and Management of Common Tinea Infections - Article

ABSTRACT: The estimated lifetime risk of acquiring a dermatophyte infection is between 10 and 20 percent. Recognition and appropriate treatment of these infections reduces both morbidity and discomfort and lessens the possibility of transmission. Dermatophyte infections are classified according to the affected body site, such as tinea capitis (scalp), tinea barbae (beard area), tinea corporis (skin other than bearded area, scalp, groin, hands or feet), tinea cruris (groin, perineum and perineal areas), tinea pedis (feet), tinea manuum (hands) and tinea unguium (nails). To determine the best treatment approach, the physician must consider several factors: (1) the anatomic locations of the infection, (2) the safety, efficacy and cost of treatment options and (3) the likelihood that the patient will comply with treatment. Newer medications in both oral and topical forms, including imidazoles and allylamines, have greatly increased the cure rate for tinea infections. Certain types of tinea may be treated with "pulse" regimens; these innovative therapies lower treatment costs and improve patient compliance.


A Persistent Facial Rash - Photo Quiz



Information From Industry