Items in AFP with MESH term: Exercise

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Osteoporosis: Part II. Nonpharmacologic and Pharmacologic Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Family physicians will frequently encounter patients with osteoporosis, a condition that is often asymptomatic until a fracture occurs. Treatment of the fracture can be initiated without further diagnostic testing. Thereafter, treatment of osteoporosis includes (1) prevention of further bone loss through weight-bearing exercise, tobacco and alcohol avoidance, hormone replacement therapy in women, and raloxifene and calcium supplementation; (2) treatment of fracture-related pain with analgesics and calcitonin; (3) building bone mass when feasible with alendronate; and (4) modifying behaviors that increase the risk of falls. Patients without fracture who are at risk for osteoporosis can also benefit from these preventive measures. Furthermore, women of all ages should be encouraged to maintain a daily calcium intake of 1,000 to 1,500 mg and to participate in weight-bearing exercise for 30 minutes three times weekly to reduce their risk of falls and fractures. Persons at risk should avoid medications known to compromise bone density, such as glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones and chronic heparin therapy.


Preventive Strategies in Chronic Liver Disease: Part I. Alcohol, Vaccines, Toxic Medications and Supplements, Diet and Exercise - Article

ABSTRACT: Chronic liver disease is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Hepatitis C virus infection is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease and the most common indication for liver transplantation. Preventive care can significantly reduce the progression of liver disease. Alcohol and hepatitis C virus are synergistic in hastening the development of cirrhosis; therefore, patients with hepatitis C infection should abstain from alcohol use. Because superinfection with hepatitis A or B virus can lead to liver failure, vaccination is recommended. Potentially hepatotoxic medications should be used with caution in patients with chronic liver disease. In general, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided; acetaminophen in a dosage below 2 g per day is the safest choice. Many herbal remedies are potentially hepatotoxic, and only milk thistle can be used safely in patients who have chronic liver disease. Weight reduction and exercise can improve liver function in patients with fatty liver.


The ABCs of Treating Congestive Heart Failure - Editorials


NIH Releases Statement on Osteoporosis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Therapy - Practice Guidelines


Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care to Promote Physical Activity: Recommendations and Rationale - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force


AHA Releases Scientific Statement on Cardiovascular Health in Childhood - Practice Guidelines


Promoting Physical Activity in the Family Practice Setting - Editorials


Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care to Promote Physical Activity - Putting Prevention into Practice


Exercise During Pregnancy: What Do We Really Know? - Editorials


ACS Releases Guidelines on Nutrition and Physical Activity During and After Cancer Treatment - Practice Guidelines


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