Items in AFP with MESH term: HIV Infections

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An HIV-Positive Patient Who Avoids Treatment - Curbside Consultation


How to Recognize and Treat Acute HIV Syndrome - Article

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) syndrome requires a high index of suspicion and proper laboratory testing. Patients with the syndrome may have fever, fatigue, rash, pharyngitis or other symptoms. Primary HIV infection should be considered in any patient with possible HIV exposure who presents with fever of unknown cause. The diagnosis is based on a positive HIV-1 RNA level (more than 50,000 copies per mL) in the absence of a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent antibody assay (ELISA) and confirmatory Western blot antibody test for HIV. Early diagnosis permits patient education as well as treatment that may delay disease progression. Triple-combination antiretroviral therapy should be started immediately and continued indefinitely. Compliance with medication regimens is essential to maximize benefit and discourage the development of viral resistance.


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


The Conundrum of Early HIV Infection - Editorials


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Newsletter - AAFP News: AFP Edition


Identification and Management of Tuberculosis - Article

ABSTRACT: Although the resurgence of tuberculosis in the early 1990s has largely been controlled, the risk of contracting this disease remains high in homeless persons, recent immigrants and persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Purified protein derivative testing should be targeted at these groups and at persons with known or suspected exposure to active tuberculosis. Most patients with latent tuberculosis are treated with isoniazid administered daily for nine months. In patients with active tuberculosis, the initial regimen should include four drugs for at least two months, with subsequent therapy determined by mycobacterial sensitivities and clinical response. To avoid harmful drug interactions, regimens that do not contain rifampin may be employed in HIV-infected patients who are taking protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To maximize compliance and minimize the emergence of mycobacterial drug resistance, family physicians should consider using directly observed therapy in all patients with tuberculosis.


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