Items in AFP with MESH term: Hepacivirus

Confronted by an Unexpected Laboratory Result - Curbside Consultation


PHS Guidelines for Management of Occupational Exposure to HBV, HCV and HIV: Implementation for Health Care Facilities - Practice Guidelines


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Screening for HCV Infection: Understanding the USPSTF Recommendation - Editorials


Integrating Risk History Screening and HCV Testing into Clinical and Public Health Settings - Editorials


Hepatitis C: Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C, a common chronic bloodborne infection, is found in approximately 2 percent of adults in the United States. Chronic infection is associated with serious morbidity and mortality (e.g., cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma). Testing for hepatitis C is recommended for at-risk populations, and confirmatory testing includes quantification of virus by polymerase chain reaction. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine screening for hepatitis C virus infection in asymptomatic adults who are not at increased risk of infection (general population). It found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening in adults at high risk of infection. Current therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus includes pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Therapy is based on factors that predict sustained virologic response, and the goal of therapy is to slow or halt progression of fibrosis and prevent the development of cirrhosis. In the future, multidrug regimens in combination with current therapies may be developed. Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection should be advised to abstain from alcohol use. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent hepatitis C virus infection; however, persons infected with hepatitis C virus should be vaccinated for hepatitis A and B. The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases recommends ultrasound surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma in persons with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and cirrhosis.


Hepatitis C: Part I. Routine Serologic Testing and Diagnosis - Article

ABSTRACT: Hepatitis C, which is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a major public health problem in the United States. HCV is most efficiently transmitted through large or repeated percutaneous exposures to blood. Most patients with acute HCV infection develop persistent infection, and 70 percent of patients develop chronic hepatitis. HCV-associated chronic liver disease results in 8,000 to 10,000 deaths per year, and the annual costs of acute and chronic hepatitis C exceed $600 million. An estimated 3.9 million Americans are currently infected with HCV, but most of these persons are asymptomatic and do not know they are infected. To identify them, primary health care professionals should obtain a history of high-risk practices associated with the transmission of HCV and other bloodborne pathogens from all patients. Routine testing is currently recommended only in patients who are most likely to be infected with HCV.


CDC Issues New Recommendations for the Prevention and Control of Hepatitis C Virus Infection - Special Medical Reports


Screening for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries



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