Items in AFP with MESH term: Neoplasms, Second Primary

Care of Cancer Survivors - Article

ABSTRACT: Cancer survivors are at increased risk for recurrence of their original malignancy; development of second primary malignancies; and medical, developmental, and psychologic problems resulting from cancer therapy, genetic predisposition to cancer, and other risk factors. Surveillance following curative cancer treatment generally includes interval history and physical examinations every six months for five years. Thereafter, histories and examinations are recommended annually for breast cancer; every three months for two years, then every six months for three to five years for colorectal cancer; and every six months for five years, then annually for prostate cancer. Recommended laboratory tests and ancillary procedures include annual mammography of preserved breast tissue in breast cancer survivors, carcinoembryonic antigen level monitoring in conjunction with annual colonoscopy in colorectal cancer patients, and prostate-specific antigen measurements every six months for five years and then annually in prostate cancer survivors. In addition, family physicians should be attentive to concerns about altered body image or sexuality issues following curative surgical procedures. Continued emphasis on preventive health practices is encouraged. Physicians should remain alert to nonspecific symptoms or physical findings (e.g., mass, adenopathy) that can indicate cancer recurrence. In childhood cancer survivors, periodic evaluation that includes a plan for surveillance and prevention, incorporating risks based on previous cancer, therapy, genetic predispositions, personal behaviors, and comorbid health conditions, is recommended.


Diagnosis and Treatment of Testicular Cancer - Article

ABSTRACT: Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in men 20 to 35 years of age and has an annual incidence of four per 100,000. If diagnosed early, the cure rate is nearly 99 percent. Risk factors for testicular cancer include cryptorchidism (i.e., undescended testicles), family history, infertility, tobacco use, and white race. Routine self-examination and physician screening have not been shown to improve outcomes, and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Cancer Society do not recommend them in asymptomatic men. Patients presenting with a painless testicular mass, scrotal heaviness, a dull ache, or acute pain should receive a thorough examination. Testicular masses should be examined with scrotal ultrasonography. If ultrasonography shows an intratesticular mass, the patient should be referred to a urologist for definitive diagnosis, orchiectomy, and further evaluation with abdominal computed tomography and chest radiography. The family physician's role after diagnosis of testicular cancer includes encouraging the patient to bank sperm because of possible infertility and evaluating for recurrence and future complications, especially cardiovascular disease.


Role of the Primary Care Physician in Hodgkin Lymphoma - Article

ABSTRACT: Approximately 8,200 new cases of Hodgkin lymphoma are diagnosed annually in the United States. Common presenting features include painless lymphadenopathy (usually above the diaphragm), cough, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. To decrease late complications, treatment has gradually evolved toward shorter-duration chemotherapy with use of lower-dose, shorter-duration radiation therapy. ABVD (a chemotherapy regimen consisting of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) is now more commonly used than MOPP (a regimen consisting of mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. Many significant complications of therapy (e.g., cardiovascular conditions, infertility, premature menopause, secondary neoplasms) directly reflect the choice of primary treatment and may be reduced by more current treatment strategies. Recurrences of Hodgkin lymphoma are most common in the first few years after diagnosis and treatment. Prognosis is related to the stage of lymphoma, disease bulk, and age of the patient. Currently, more than 80 percent of patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma are expected to be long-term survivors.


Multiple Erythematous Plaques of the Trunk - Photo Quiz



Information From Industry