Items in AFP with MESH term: Arthritis, Reactive

Spondyloarthropathies - Article

ABSTRACT: The spondyloarthropathies include ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis (including Reiter's syndrome), psoriatic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthropathy, and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. These diseases are linked by their association with the HLA-B27 gene and by the presence of enthesitis as the basic pathologic lesion. Additional clinical features include inflammatory back pain, dactylitis, and extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis and skin rash. The history and physical examination are the major diagnostic tools, although radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis is helpful. Therapeutic options include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sulfasalazine, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors. Early recognition and appropriate treatment can help to limit disability.


Evaluation of Poststreptococcal Illness - Article

ABSTRACT: Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, scarlet fever, and rarely asymptomatic carrier states are associated with a number of poststreptococcal suppurative and nonsuppurative complications. As in streptococcal pharyngitis, acute rheumatic fever, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection, and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis most often occur in children. The hallmarks of rheumatic fever include arthritis, carditis, cutaneous disease, chorea, and subsequent acquired valvular disease. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders encompass a subgroup of illnesses involving the basal ganglia in children with obsessive-compulsive disorders, tic disorders, dystonia, chorea encephalitis, and dystonic choreoathetosis. Poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis is most frequently encountered in children between two and six years of age with a recent history of pharyngitis and a rash in the setting of poor personal hygiene during the winter months. The clinical examination of a patient with possible poststreptococcal complications should begin with an evaluation for signs of inflammation (i.e., complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) and evidence of a preceding streptococcal infection. Antistreptolysin O titers should be obtained to confirm a recent invasive streptococcal infection. Other important antibody markers include antihyaluronidase, antideoxyribonuclease B, and antistreptokinase antibodies.


Diagnosis and Treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection - Article

ABSTRACT: Chlamydia trachomatis infection most commonly affects the urogenital tract. In men, the infection usually is symptomatic, with dysuria and a discharge from the penis. Untreated chlamydial infection in men can spread to the epididymis. Most women with chlamydial infection have minimal or no symptoms, but some develop pelvic inflammatory disease. Chlamydial infection in newborns can cause ophthalmia neonatorum. Chlamydial pneumonia can occur at one to three months of age, manifesting as a protracted onset of staccato cough, usually without wheezing or fever. Treatment options for uncomplicated urogenital infections include a single 1-g dose of azithromycin orally, or doxycycline at a dosage of 100 mg orally twice per day for seven days. The recommended treatment during pregnancy is erythromycin base or amoxicillin. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommend screening for chlamydial infection in women at increased risk of infection and in all women younger than 25 years.


Reactive Arthritis (Reiter's Syndrome) - Article

ABSTRACT: Reactive arthritis, also called Reiter's syndrome, is the most common type of inflammatory polyarthritis in young men. It is sometimes the first manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection. An HLA-B27 genotype is a predisposing factor in over two thirds of patients with reactive arthritis. The syndrome most frequently follows genitourinary infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, but other organisms have also been implicated. Treatment with doxycycline or its analogs sometimes shortens the course or aborts the onset of the arthritis. Reactive arthritis may also follow enteric infections with some strains of Salmonella or Shigella, but use of antibiotics in these patients has not been shown to be effective. Reactive arthritis should always be considered in young men who present with polyarthritis. Symptoms may persist for long periods and may, in some cases, cause long-term disability. Initial treatment consists of high doses of potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Patients with large-joint involvement may also benefit from intra-articular corticosteroid injection.



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