Items in AFP with MESH term: AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections

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Management of Newborns Exposed to Maternal HIV Infection - Article

ABSTRACT: The management of infants whose mothers are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) involves minimizing the risk of vertical transmission of HIV, recognizing neonatal HIV infection early, preventing opportunistic infections, and addressing psychosocial issues. Maternal antiretroviral drug therapy during pregnancy and labor, followed by six weeks of neonatal zidovudine therapy, can significantly decrease the risk of vertical transmission. Additional antiretroviral drugs may be needed in some high-risk newborns. Elective cesarean section also may prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Virologic tests allow early diagnosis of HIV infection, facilitating the timely initiation of aggressive treatment and the prevention of opportunistic infections. Even when tests are negative, infants must be closely monitored until age 18 months to completely rule out HIV infection. Prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia should be initiated when HIV-exposed infants are six weeks old and should be continued for at least four months, regardless of negative virologic tests, because P. carinii pneumonia is often the initial presentation of HIV infection in infants. Laboratory monitoring, screening for perinatal infections, appropriate social support, and other modifications of standard infant care are also necessary.


Cytomegalovirus - Article

ABSTRACT: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a prevalent viral pathogen. The majority of persons with acute CMV will experience an inapparent infection. Primary CMV infection will cause up to 7 percent of cases of mononucleosis syndrome and will manifest symptoms almost indistinguishable from those of Epstein-Barr virus-induced mononucleosis. CMV, or heterophil-negative mononucleosis, is best diagnosed using a positive IgM serology. Complications of acute CMV infection in immunocompetent persons are rare, except in newborns. The virus usually is spread through close personal contact; transmission risk can be reduced by following simple hygienic and handwashing techniques. Severe illness can occur after reactivation of the latent virus in immunosuppressed persons. The retina is the most common site of CMV-induced pathology in persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have decreased the incidence of CMV retinitis but have resulted in a new set of ophthalmologic complications induced by restoration of immune competency and the pro-inflammatory response of the patient to CMV. If HAART restores the patient's CD4 cell count to above 100 to 150 per mm3 (100 to 150 x 10(6) per L), it may preclude lifelong treatment for CMV retinitis.


Preventive Counseling, Screening, and Therapy for the Patient with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection - Article

ABSTRACT: The epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues, and the infection is converting into a treatable chronic disease; therefore, it is increasingly important for family physicians to be current with and comfortable in providing basic care to patients infected with HIV. Important aspects of counseling and patient education include stabilization of psychosocial issues and prevention of HIV transmission through behavior change counseling. Reporting HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mandatory in most states, whereas partner notification laws vary from state to state. Baseline evaluation includes screening for comorbid conditions such as viral hepatitis, syphilis, and tuberculosis, as well as common HIV-related manifestations such as recurrent candidal infections and thrombocytopenia. Baseline testing includes CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell counts and HIV viral RNA levels to assess HIV disease stage, and numerous studies to screen for opportunistic infections. Initial preventive interventions include patient education to reduce exposure to infections, treatment of comorbid conditions such as human papillomavirus-related dysplasia, and vaccinations such as for pneumococcus and hepatitis B. Prophylaxis against opportunistic pathogens is recommended when CD4+ cell counts fall below 200 cells per mm3. Lastly, the indications for antiretroviral therapy include symptomatic patients or those with AIDS, and pre-AIDS patients with CD4+ cell counts of 200 to 350 cells per mm3 or HIV RNA above 55,000 to 100,000 copies per mL.


Head and Neck Manifestations of AIDS in Adults - Article

ABSTRACT: Head and neck manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are among the most common complications of this disease. Some of these manifestations are the initial signs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and others are associated with full-blown AIDS. Otologic manifestations include otitis externa, otitis media, Kaposi's sarcoma and sensorineural hearing loss. Nasal and oral manifestations of AIDS are more common than otologic manifestations and range from infections, caused by both opportunistic and nonopportunistic organisms, to malignancies. We address common manifestations and current treatment recommendations.


Evaluation and Treatment of Weight Loss in Adults with HIV Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Weight loss late in the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease is common and often multifactorial. Increased energy expenditure in response to opportunistic disease, as well as to HIV infection itself, can lead to protein-calorie malnutrition similar to that observed in starvation. Weight loss of as little as 5 percent in patients with HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of disease progression. Loss of body cell mass carries a particularly poor prognosis, and aggressive measures should be taken to stop such depletion. Patients exhibiting unexpected weight loss should be carefully examined to exclude decreased food intake, malabsorption, occult infection or neoplasm as the etiology of the weight loss. Early aggressive treatment of HIV disease and underlying opportunistic pathology, along with adequate pharmacologic, hormonal, nutritional and physical therapy, can often restore normal weight and body composition.


Obstetric Care of Patients with HIV Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Appropriate management of pregnant patients who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease can have a major impact on maternal and infant health. The goals of therapy are to properly manage the pregnancy, treat the maternal HIV infection and minimize the risk of vertical transmission of HIV. Early detection of HIV through aggressive screening programs is necessary to initiate timely therapy. Zidovudine therapy given antepartum and intrapartum to the mother and after birth to the newborn has been shown to decrease the risk of vertical transmission. Evidence suggests that more aggressive antiretroviral therapy for the mother, which allows suppression of viral loads to undetectable levels, may be safe and may provide significant additional benefits. However, treatment needs to be individualized, weighing the possible teratogenic risks against the benefits of decreased transmission. Multiple prospective cohort studies support elective cesarean section as an additional means to decrease vertical transmission, but its role in relation to other therapies has not been determined. As in nonpregnant patients infected with HIV, prevention of opportunistic infections and adequate psychosocial support are essential.


Complications of HIV Infection: A Systems-Based Approach - Article

ABSTRACT: Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection often develop multiple complications and comorbidities. Opportunistic infections should always be considered in the evaluation of symptomatic patients with advanced HIV/AIDS, although the overall incidence of these infections has decreased. Primary care of HIV infection includes the early detection of some complications through screening at-risk and symptomatic patients with routine laboratory monitoring (e.g., comprehensive metabolic and lipid panels) and validated tools (e.g., the HIV Dementia Scale). Treatment of many chronic complications is similar for patients with HIV infection and those without infection; however, combination antiretroviral therapy has shown benefit for some conditions, such as HIV-associated nephropathy. For other complications, such as cardiovascular disease and lipoatrophy, management may include switching antiretroviral regimens to reduce exposure to HIV medications known to cause toxicity.


Family Physicians and the Tuberculosis Epidemic - Editorials


Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


Conference Highlights - Conference Highlights


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