Items in AFP with MESH term: Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors

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NAMS Releases Position Statement on the Treatment of Vasomotor Symptoms Associated with Menopause - Practice Guidelines


Drug Treatments for Patients with Dysthymia - Cochrane for Clinicians


St. John's Wort for Depression - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Is Pharmacotherapy Useful in Social Phobia? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Duloxetine (Cymbalta) for Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder - STEPS


Identifying Effective Alternative Therapies for Common Conditions - Editorials


Are SSRIs Effective for Treating OCD? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: Diagnosis and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Obsessive-compulsive disorder is an illness that can cause marked distress and disability. It often goes unrecognized and is undertreated. Primary care physicians should be familiar with the various ways obsessive-compulsive disorder can present and should be able to recognize clues to the presence of obsessions or compulsions. Proper diagnosis and education about the nature of the disorder are important first steps in recovery. Treatment is rarely curative, but patients can have significant improvement in symptoms. Recommended first-line therapy is cognitive behavior therapy with exposure and response prevention or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The medication doses required for treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder are often higher than those for other indications, and the length of time to response is typically longer. There are a variety of options for treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder, including augmentation of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with an atypical antipsychotic. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic condition with a high rate of relapse. Discontinuation of treatment should be undertaken with caution. Patients should be closely monitored for comorbid depression and suicidal ideation.


Depression in Post-MI Patients: An Opportunity for Primary Care - Editorials


Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Practical Assessment and Management - Article

ABSTRACT: Generalized anxiety disorder is common among patients in primary care. Affected patients experience excessive chronic anxiety and worry about events and activities, such as their health, family, work, and finances. The anxiety and worry are difficult to control and often lead to physiologic symptoms, including fatigue, muscle tension, restlessness, and other somatic complaints. Other psychiatric problems (e.g., depression) and nonpsychiatric factors (e.g., endocrine disorders, medication adverse effects, withdrawal) must be considered in patients with possible generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy and the first-line pharmacologic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are effective treatments. However, evidence suggests that the effects of cognitive behavior therapy may be more durable. Although complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been used, their effectiveness has not been proven in generalized anxiety disorder. Selection of the most appropriate treatment should be based on patient preference, treatment success history, and other factors that could affect adherence and subsequent effectiveness.


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