Items in AFP with MESH term: Hyperpigmentation

Common Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Adults: Part I. Diagnostic Approach, Cafe au Lait Macules, Diffuse Hyperpigmentation, Sun Exposure, and Phototoxic Reactions - Article

ABSTRACT: The cause of hyperpigmentation usually is traced to the activity and presence of melanocytes. Cafe au lait macules may be solitary benign findings or may indicate the presence of neurofibromatosis with its associated complications. Diffuse hyperpigmentation should prompt a search for offending medications or systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, hyperthyroidism, and Addison's disease. In these instances, the hyperpigmentation may be ameliorated by discontinuing offending medications, performing serial phlebotomy in patients with hemochromatosis, instituting cause-specific treatments in patients with hyperthyroidism, and replacing deficient glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids in patients with Addison's disease. Cosmetic treatment with bleaching agents or lasers can be used to decrease pigmentation of ephelides (freckles) and lentigines.


Facial Hyperpigmentation - Photo Quiz


Common Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Adults: Part II. Melanoma, Seborrheic Keratoses, Acanthosis Nigricans, Melasma, Diabetic Dermopathy, Tinea Versicolor, and Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation - Article

ABSTRACT: Nevi, or moles, are localized nevocytic tumors. The American Cancer Society's “ABCD” rules are useful for differentiating a benign nevus from malignant melanoma. While acanthosis nigricans may signal an underlying malignancy (e.g., gastrointestinal tumor), it more often is associated with insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome) or obesity. Melasma is a facial hyperpigmentation resulting from the stimulation of melanocytes by endogenous or exogenous estrogen. Treatments for melasma include bleaching agents, laser therapy, and a new medication that combines hydroquinone, tretinoin, and fluocinolone acetonide. Lesions that develop on the shins of patients with diabetic dermopathy often resolve spontaneously; no treatment is effective or recommended. Tinea versicolor responds to treatment with selenium sulfide shampoo and topical or oral antifungal agents. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation can occur in persons of any age after trauma, skin irritation, or dermatoses.


Distal Upper Extremity Edema and Discoloration - Photo Quiz


Dermatologic Conditions in Skin of Color: Part I. Special Considerations for Common Skin Disorders - Article

ABSTRACT: Skin of color traditionally refers to that of persons of African, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern, and Hispanic backgrounds. Differences in cutaneous structure and function can result in skin conditions with distinct presentations and varying prevalence that require unique treatment. Skin cancers have different presentations in these populations. The ability to recognize and diagnose skin cancer in a timely manner is important for reducing morbidity and mortality. Basal cell carcinoma often is pigmented, squamous cell carcinoma occurs in areas of chronic scarring and inflammation, and melanoma presents in non–sun-exposed areas, such as the soles and nail beds. Diagnosis requires biopsy, with the technique depending on size and location of the lesion. Treatment options range from topical to surgical. Acne commonly results in postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloids. Combination therapy with topical antibiotics and benzoyl peroxide is generally more effective than monotherapy for treating acne. Use of retinoids at lower concentrations and at less frequent dosing can help prevent postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.



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