Items in AFP with MESH term: Domestic Violence

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Do I Get to Decide Who Should Have a Baby? - Curbside Consultation


Blunt Trauma in Pregnancy - Article

ABSTRACT: Trauma is the most common cause of nonobstetric death among pregnant women in the United States. Motor vehicle crashes, domestic violence, and falls are the most common causes of blunt trauma during pregnancy. All pregnant patients with traumatic injury should be assessed formally in a medical setting because placental abruption can have dire fetal consequences and can present with few or no symptoms. Evaluation and treatment are the same as for nonpregnant patients, except that the uterus should be shifted off the great vessels. After initial stabilization, management includes electronic fetal monitoring, ultrasonography, and laboratory studies. Electronic fetal monitoring currently is the most accurate measure of fetal status after trauma, although the optimal duration of monitoring has not been established. Prevention of trauma through proper seat belt use during pregnancy and recognition of domestic violence during prenatal care is important.


Evidence-Based Prenatal Care: Part I. General Prenatal Care and Counseling Issues - Article

ABSTRACT: Effective prenatal care should integrate the best available evidence into a model of shared decision making. Pregnant women should be counseled about the risks of smoking and alcohol and drug use. Structured educational programs to promote breastfeeding are effective. Routine fetal heart auscultation, urinalysis, and assessment of maternal weight, blood pressure, and fundal height generally are recommended, although the evidence for these interventions is variable. Women should be offered ABO and Rh blood typing and screening for anemia during the first prenatal visit. Genetic counseling and testing should be offered to couples with a family history of genetic disorders, a previously affected fetus or child, or a history of recurrent miscarriage. All women should be offered prenatal serum marker screening for neural tube defects and aneuploidy. Women at increased risk for aneuploidy should be offered amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Counseling about the limitations and risks of these tests, as well as their psychologic implications, is necessary. Folic acid supplementation beginning in the preconception period reduces the incidence of neural tube defects. There is limited evidence that routine use of other dietary supplements may improve outcomes for the mother and infant.


Witnessing Domestic Violence: the Effect on Children - Medicine and Society


Routine Screening for Depression, Alcohol Problems, and Domestic Violence - Point-of-Care Guides


Protecting American Families from Injury - Editorials


Adolescent Pregnancy and Associated Risks: Not Just a Result of Maternal Age - Editorials


Cultural Aspects of Caring for Refugees - Medicine and Society


Case Studies in Partner Violence - Article

ABSTRACT: Interpersonal violence and abuse, especially between relatives and domestic partners, are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Family physicians and other professionals who provide primary care health services must deal with acute presentations and chronic sequelae of this epidemic. Many victims of abuse hesitate to seek help, while those who batter are often difficult to identify. Medical management of patients in abusive relationships can be frustrating. Evaluating injury patterns, understanding factors that increase the risk for violence and making use of specific interview questions and techniques will aid family physicians in the difficult task of assessing and managing patients living in abusive partnerships.


Reframing Our Approach to Domestic Violence: The Cyclic Batterer Syndrome - Editorials


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