Items in AFP with MESH term: Antibiotic Prophylaxis

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Antibiotics for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections - Cochrane for Clinicians


Prophylaxis for Invasive Dental Procedures in At-Risk Patients - Cochrane for Clinicians


Current Guidelines for Antibiotic Prophylaxis of Surgical Wounds - Article

ABSTRACT: Appropriately administered antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the incidence of surgical wound infection. Prophylaxis is uniformly recommended for all clean-contaminated, contaminated and dirty procedures. It is considered optional for most clean procedures, although it may be indicated for certain patients and clean procedures that fulfill specific risk criteria. Timing of antibiotic administration is critical to efficacy. The first dose should always be given before the procedure, preferably within 30 minutes before incision. Readministration at one to two half-lives of the antibiotic is recommended for the duration of the procedure. In general, postoperative administration is not recommended. Antibiotic selection is influenced by the organism most commonly causing wound infection in the specific procedure and by the relative costs of available agents. In certain gastrointestinal procedures, oral and intravenous administration of agents with activity against gram-negative and anaerobic bacteria is warranted, as well as mechanical preparation of the bowel. Cefazolin provides adequate coverage for most other types of procedures.


1999 USPHS/IDSA Guidelines for the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with HIV: Part II. Prevention of the First Episode of Disease - Article


Antiobiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Surgical Site Infections - Article

ABSTRACT: Surgical site infections are the most common nosocomial infections in surgical patients, accounting for approximately 500,000 infections annually. Surgical site infections also account for nearly 4 million excess hospital days annually, and nearly $2 billion in increased health care costs. To reduce the burden of these infections, a partnership of national organizations, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, created the Surgical Care Improvement Project and developed six infection prevention measures. Of these, three core measures contain recommendations regarding selection of prophylactic antibiotic, timing of administration, and duration of therapy. For most patients undergoing clean-contaminated surgeries (e.g., cardiothoracic, gastrointestinal, orthopedic, vascular, gynecologic), a cephalosporin is the recommended prophylactic antibiotic. Hospital compliance with infection prevention measures is publicly reported. Because primary care physicians participate in the pre- and postoperative care of patients, they should be familiar with the Surgical Care Improvement Project recommendations.


Infectious Endocarditis: Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Infectious endocarditis results from bacterial or fungal infection of the endocardial surface of the heart and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Risk factors include the presence of a prosthetic heart valve, structural or congenital heart disease, intravenous drug use, and a recent history of invasive procedures. Endocarditis should be suspected in patients with unexplained fevers, night sweats, or signs of systemic illness. Diagnosis is made using the Duke criteria, which include clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic findings. Antibiotic treatment of infectious endocarditis depends on whether the involved valve is native or prosthetic, as well as the causative microorganism and its antibiotic susceptibilities. Common blood culture isolates include Staphylococcus aureus, viridans Streptococcus, enterococci, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Valvular structural and functional integrity may be adversely affected in infectious endocarditis, and surgical consultation is warranted in patients with aggressive or persistent infections, emboli, and valvular compromise or rupture. After completion of antibiotic therapy, patients should be educated about the importance of daily dental hygiene, regular visits to the dentist, and the need for antibiotic prophylaxis before certain procedures.


Evaluation and Management of Corneal Abrasions - Article

ABSTRACT: Corneal abrasions are commonly encountered in primary care. Patients typically present with a history of trauma and symptoms of foreign body sensation, tearing, and sensitivity to light. History and physical examination should exclude serious causes of eye pain, including penetrating injury, infective keratitis, and corneal ulcers. After fluorescein staining of the cornea, an abrasion will appear yellow under normal light and green in cobalt blue light. Physicians should carefully examine for foreign bodies and remove them, if present. The goals of treatment include pain control, prevention of infection, and healing. Pain relief may be achieved with topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or oral analgesics. Evidence does not support the use of topical cycloplegics for uncomplicated corneal abrasions. Patching is not recommended because it does not improve pain and has the potential to delay healing. Although evidence is lacking, topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed to prevent bacterial superinfection. Contact lens–related abrasions should be treated with antipseudomonal topical antibiotics. Follow-up may not be necessary for patients with small (4 mm or less), uncomplicated abrasions; normal vision; and resolving symptoms. All other patients should be reevaluated in 24 hours. Referral is indicated for any patient with symptoms that do not improve or that worsen, a corneal infiltrate or ulcer, significant vision loss, or a penetrating eye injury.


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