Items in AFP with MESH term: Evidence-Based Medicine

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Subclinical Hypothyroidism - Cochrane for Clinicians


Are SSRIs Effective for Treating OCD? - Cochrane for Clinicians


Identifying and Using Good Practice Guidelines - Article

ABSTRACT: Performance measurement and payment are increasingly linked to goals established by practice guidelines. The best guidelines are based on systematic reviews and patient-oriented evidence, use an evidence-rating system such as the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy, and are prospectively validated. The guidelines also should have a transparent development process, identify potential conflicts of interest, and offer flexibility in various clinical situations.


A Tool for Evaluating Hypertension - Improving Patient Care


Antiepileptic Drug Level Monitoring - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Cranberry Products for Treatment of Urinary Tract Infection - Cochrane for Clinicians


Antibiotics for Acute Maxillary Sinusitis - Cochrane for Clinicians


Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much: An Evidence-Based Guide for Primary Care Physicians - Article

ABSTRACT: Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality, but few heavy drinkers receive treatment. Primary care physicians are in a position to address heavy drinking and alcohol use disorders with patients, and can do so quickly and effectively. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has published a guide for physicians that offers an evidence-based approach to screening, assessing, and treating alcohol use disorders in general health care settings. Screening can be performed by asking patients how many heavy drinking days they have per week. Assessing patients' willingness to change their drinking behaviors can guide treatment. Treatment recommendations should be presented in a clear, nonjudgmental way. Patients who are not alcohol-dependent may opt to reduce drinking to lower risk levels. Patients with alcohol dependence should receive pharmacotherapy and brief behavioral support, as well as disease management for chronic relapsing dependence. All patients with alcohol dependence should be encouraged to participate in community support groups


Combination Therapy for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries


Prevention, Recognition, and Management of Serotonin Syndrome - Article

ABSTRACT: Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition caused by excessive serotonergic activity in the nervous system. It is characterized by mental status changes, autonomic instability, and neuromuscular hyperactivity. Most reported cases of serotonin syndrome are in patients using multiple serotonergic drugs or who have had considerable exposure to a single serotonin-augmenting drug. Diagnosis is made using the Hunter Serotonin Toxicity Criteria, which require the presence of one of the following classical features or groups of features: spontaneous clonus; inducible clonus with agitation or diaphoresis; ocular clonus with agitation or diaphoresis; tremor and hyperreflexia; or hypertonia, temperature above 100.4°?F (38°?C), and ocular or inducible clonus. Most cases of serotonin syndrome are mild and may be treated by withdrawal of the offending agent and supportive care. Benzodiazepines may be used to treat agitation and tremor. Cyproheptadine may be used as an antidote. Patients with moderate or severe cases of serotonin syndrome require hospitalization. Critically ill patients may require neuromuscular paralysis, sedation, and intubation. If serotonin syndrome is recognized and complications are managed appropriately, the prognosis is favorable.


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