Items in AFP with MESH term: Diabetes Complications

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Hypertension and Diabetes: Family Physicians' Pivotal Role - Editorials


Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus - Putting Prevention into Practice


Exercise is an Effective Intervention in Overweight and Obese Patients - Cochrane for Clinicians


Yellow-White Retinal Lesion in a 48-year-old Woman - Photo Quiz


Common Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Adults: Part II. Melanoma, Seborrheic Keratoses, Acanthosis Nigricans, Melasma, Diabetic Dermopathy, Tinea Versicolor, and Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation - Article

ABSTRACT: Nevi, or moles, are localized nevocytic tumors. The American Cancer Society's “ABCD” rules are useful for differentiating a benign nevus from malignant melanoma. While acanthosis nigricans may signal an underlying malignancy (e.g., gastrointestinal tumor), it more often is associated with insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome) or obesity. Melasma is a facial hyperpigmentation resulting from the stimulation of melanocytes by endogenous or exogenous estrogen. Treatments for melasma include bleaching agents, laser therapy, and a new medication that combines hydroquinone, tretinoin, and fluocinolone acetonide. Lesions that develop on the shins of patients with diabetic dermopathy often resolve spontaneously; no treatment is effective or recommended. Tinea versicolor responds to treatment with selenium sulfide shampoo and topical or oral antifungal agents. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation can occur in persons of any age after trauma, skin irritation, or dermatoses.


Glycemic Control in Hospitalized Patients Not in Intensive Care: Beyond Sliding-Scale Insulin - Article

ABSTRACT: Glycemic control in hospitalized patients who are not in intensive care remains unsatisfactory. Despite persistent expert recommendations urging its abandonment, the use of sliding-scale insulin remains pervasive in U.S. hospitals. Evidence for the effectiveness of sliding-scale insulin is lacking after more than 40 years of use. New physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols use basal, nutritional, and correctional insulin. The initial total daily dose of subcutaneous insulin is calculated using a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 units per kg body weight, with one half given as long-acting insulin (the basal insulin dose), and the other one half divided daily over three meals as short-acting insulin doses (nutritional insulin doses). A correctional insulin dose provides a final insulin adjustment based on the preprandial glucose value. This correctional dose resembles a sliding scale, but is only a small fine-tuning of therapy, as opposed to traditional sliding-scale insulin alone. Insulin sensitivity, nutritional intake, and total daily dosing review can alter the physiologic insulin-dosing schedule. Prospective trials have demonstrated reductions in hyperglycemic measurements, hypoglycemia, and adjusted hospital length of stay when physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols are used. Transitions in care require special considerations and attention to glycemic control medications. Changing the sliding-scale insulin culture requires a multidisciplinary effort to improve patient safety and outcomes.


Screening for Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults - Putting Prevention into Practice


Glycemic Control in the Hospital: What to Do When Experts Disagree - Editorials


Simplifying the Diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus - Editorials


AHA Examines Cardiovascular Problems in Diabetes - Practice Guidelines


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