Items in AFP with MESH term: Papillomavirus Vaccines

HPV Vaccine: A Cornerstone of Female Health - Editorials


Human Papillomavirus: Clinical Manifestations and Prevention - Article

ABSTRACT: Human papillomaviruses cause the most common sexually trans- mitted infection in the world and are responsible for nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Genital human papillomavirus infection can be divided into low-risk infections (causing genital warts) and high-risk infections (causing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and cervical and other cancers). Exposure to human papilloma- virus typically produces a sexually transmitted infection that may progress to a clinically apparent process, such as genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions of the lower genital tract. Although most human papillomavirus infections resolve spontane- ously within two years, some high-risk infections persist and are considered cancer precursors. Risk factors for persistent infection include multiple sex partners, sex at an early age, history of sexually transmitted infections, and smoking. Condom use is only partially protective against human papillomavirus infection. The two human papillomavirus vaccines are most effective if given to girls before the onset of sexual activity.


Bivalent HPV Recombinant Vaccine (Cervarix) for the Prevention of Cervical Cancer - STEPS


Update on Immunizations in Adults - Article

ABSTRACT: Vaccine-preventable diseases contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of U.S. adults. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updates its recommended adult immunization schedule annually. The most recent updates include the permissive but not routine use of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine to prevent genital warts in males; a single dose of herpes zoster vaccine for adults 60 years and older, regardless of their history; replacing a single dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (Td) vaccine with tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine in adults 19 years and older who have not previously received Tdap; expanding the indications for pneumococcal polyvalent-23 vaccine to include all adults with asthma and all smokers; annual seasonal influenza vaccination for all adults; and booster doses of meningococcal vaccine for adults with high-risk conditions. It is vital for family physicians to implement a systematic approach to adult immunization that is patient-, staff-, and physician-focused.


ACS/ASCCP/ASCP Guidelines for the Early Detection of Cervical Cancer - Editorials


Management of External Genital Warts - Article

ABSTRACT: Genital warts affect 1% of the sexually active U.S. population and are commonly seen in primary care. Human papillomavirus types 6 and 11 are responsible for most genital warts. Warts vary from small, flat-topped papules to large, cauliflower-like lesions on the anogenital mucosa and surrounding skin. Diagnosis is clinical, but atypical lesions should be confirmed by histology. Treatments may be applied by patients, or by a clinician in the office. Patient-applied treatments include topical imiquimod, podofilox, and sinecatechins, whereas clinician-applied treatments include podophyllin, bichloroacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. Surgical treatments include excision, cryotherapy, and electrosurgery. The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine is active against virus subtypes that cause genital warts in men and women. Additionally, male circumcision may be effective in decreasing the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus, and herpes simplex virus.



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