Jun 2003 Table of Contents

LETTERS

Fam Pract Manag. 2003 Jun;10(6):11-12.

Advantages of shared care



FREE PREVIEW Log in or buy this issue to read the full article. AAFP members and paid subscribers get free access to all articles. Subscribe now.


FREE PREVIEW Subscribe or buy this issue. AAFP members and paid subscribers get free access to all articles.

To the Editor:

I have been “Sharing Maternity Care” [March 2003, page 37] for nearly two years, providing prenatal care to my patients and having their babies delivered by an obstetrician. It began as a response to hospital politics, but then rising malpractice rates made it prohibitive for me to deliver babies. I’ve found this arrangement satisfactory for my patients and me. Developing a relationship with one doctor helps a patient feel more comfortable asking questions. Instead of seeing multiple doctors, as is common in many large ob/gyn practices, most patients see me for the vast majority of their prenatal visits. After about 26 weeks, the patient sees the obstetrician for an ultrasound and exam. If there are signs of complications at any time, the obstetrician takes over the patient’s care. Otherwise, I see the patient through 36 weeks or until labor begins.

I note the level of service incurred at each visit so that if I relinquish care before 36 weeks, I can total the charges and submit a claim. If I see the patient more than 36 weeks, I charge my usual prenatal-care fee. I’d encourage other physicians, particularly those wanting to “ease out” of obstetrics, to consider the shared care model.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU

Send your comments to fpmedit@aafp.org. Submission of a letter will be construed as granting AAFP permission to publish the letter in any of its publications in any form. We cannot respond to all letters we receive. Those chosen for publication will be edited for length and style.

Copyright © 2003 by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
This content is owned by the AAFP. A person viewing it online may make one printout of the material and may use that printout only for his or her personal, non-commercial reference. This material may not otherwise be downloaded, copied, printed, stored, transmitted or reproduced in any medium, whether now known or later invented, except as authorized in writing by the AAFP. Contact fpmserv@aafp.org for copyright questions and/or permission requests.

Want to use this article elsewhere? Get Permissions


Article Tools

  • Print page
  • Share this page
  • FPM CME Quiz

Information From Industry