Items in FPM with MESH term: Coronary Artery Bypass

Percutaneous Interventions for Lower Extremity Peripheral Vascular Disease - Article

ABSTRACT: Peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities is an important cause of morbidity that affects up to 10 million people in the United States. The primary care physician can easily identify patients who are at risk for the disease with a questionnaire and a relatively simple test-the ankle brachial index. More than 70 percent of patients diagnosed with the disease remain stable or improve with conservative management. Those who do not improve may undergo contrast angiography or magnetic resonance angiography, which may be used in planning for surgery or percutaneous intervention. Surgical bypass is the gold standard for extensive vascular occlusive disease, but endovascular interventions, including percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement, are being used more frequently, particularly in patients with significant comorbid conditions.

When Medical Errors Hit Home - Balancing Act

Unstable Angina and Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Part II. Coronary Revascularization, Hospital Discharge, and Post-Hospital Care - Article

ABSTRACT: In the guideline developed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, the management of suspected unstable angina and non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI) has four components: initial evaluation and management; hospital care; coronary revascularization; and hospital discharge and post-hospital care. Part II of this two-part article discusses coronary revascularization, hospital discharge, and post-hospital care. Decisions must be made about the use of coronary angiography and coronary revascularization in patients hospitalized with UA/NSTEMI. With an early conservative strategy, medical management is employed. Coronary angiography and revascularization are reserved for use in patients with evidence of ischemia at rest (or with minimal activity) and patients with a strongly positive stress test. With an early invasive strategy, coronary angiography and revascularization are recommended within 48 hours in patients without contraindications. Hospital discharge planning involves coordination of medical care, preparation of the patient for resumption of normal activities, and evaluation of the need for long-term risk factor reduction. Discharge medications should be continued to control ongoing symptoms (anti-ischemic agents) and prevent recurrent events (aspirin, clopidogrel, beta blocker, and an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or statins in selected patients).

ACC/AHA Revise Guidelines for Coronary Bypass Surgery - Practice Guidelines

PRE-OPportunity Knocks: A Different Way to Think About the Preoperative Evaluation - Editorials


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