Items in FPM with MESH term: Cardiovascular Diseases

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Are Beta Blockers Effective First-line Treatments for Hypertension? - Cochrane for Clinicians

Diet and Exercise in the Management of Hyperlipidemia - Article

ABSTRACT: Dietary factors that influence lipid levels include modification of nutritional components, consumption of specific foods, use of food additives and supplements, and major dietary approaches. The most beneficial changes result from reducing intake of saturated and trans fats; increasing intake of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats; fortifying foods with plant stanols or sterols; isocalorically adding tree nuts to the diet; consuming one or two alcoholic drinks per day; and adopting a Portfolio, Mediterranean, low-carbohydrate, or low-fat diet. Smaller but still beneficial effects result from reducing intake of dietary cholesterol, increasing intake of soluble fiber and soy protein, and eating fatty marine fish or taking marine-derived omega-3 fatty acid supplements. Red yeast rice supplements have effects similar to those of statin medications and are better tolerated in some patients. Regular aerobic exercise has beneficial effects on lipid levels, particularly if performed for at least 120 minutes per week. Brief physician counseling will have relatively small effects on unselected patients, so efforts should be concentrated on patients who are motivated and ready to make lifestyle changes.

Screening for Hyperlipidemia in Children: Primum Non Nocere - Editorials

Hyperlipidemia Treatment in Children: The Younger, the Better - Editorials

Counseling Patients About Hormone Therapy and Alternatives for Menopausal Symptoms - Article

ABSTRACT: The results of recent large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of menopausal hormone therapy. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy in an attempt to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease. Hormone therapy appears to increase the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years; therefore, regulatory agencies now advise that physicians prescribe it only to treat menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and vaginal atrophy, with the smallest effective dosage and for the shortest possible duration. Although estrogen is the most effective treatment for hot flashes, alternatives such as venlafaxine and gabapentin are effective for some patients. Herbal formulations such as dong quai, ginseng, kava, and dietary soy, among others, do not appear to benefit patients more than placebo. In contrast to systemic estrogen therapy, topical estrogen therapy for vulvovaginal atrophy is more appealing for certain patients because it does not require the addition of a progestogen for endometrial protection. Some have advocated selective estrogen reuptake modulators as alternatives to hormone therapy for the prevention of menopausal osteoporosis. The decision to use either therapy depends on clinical presentation and a thorough evaluation of the risks and benefits, because both have potential detrimental health effects and both are linked to an increased risk of venous thromboembolism.

American Heart Association Releases Scientific Statement on Cardiovascular Disease in Women - Special Medical Reports

Cardiovascular Risk Profiling in Blacks: Don't Forget the Lipids - Editorials

ACSM/AHA Release Recommendations for Fitness Facilities - Special Medical Reports

Does Estrogen Therapy Have a Role in Cardiovascular Prevention? - Editorials

AHA and ACC Issue Scientific Statement on Preventive Cardiology for Women - Special Medical Reports

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