Items in FPM with MESH term: Chronic Disease

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Chronic Low Back Pain - Clinical Evidence Handbook

Headache (Chronic Tension-Type) - Clinical Evidence Handbook

When a Patient's Chronic Pain Gets Worse - Curbside Consultation

Five Communication Strategies to Promote Self-Management of Chronic Illness - Feature

Nonmalignant Chronic Pain: Taking the Time to Treat - Curbside Consultation

ICSI Releases Guideline on Chronic Pain Assessment and Management - Practice Guidelines

Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Prostatitis ranges from a straightforward clinical entity in its acute form to a complex, debilitating condition when chronic. It is often a source of frustration for the treating physician and patient. There are four classifications of prostatitis: acute bacterial, chronic bacterial, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic. Diagnosis of acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis is primarily based on history, physical examination, urine culture, and urine specimen testing pre- and post-prostatic massage. The differential diagnosis of prostatitis includes acute cystitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, urinary tract stones, bladder cancer, prostatic abscess, enterovesical fistula, and foreign body within the urinary tract. The mainstay of therapy is an antimicrobial regimen. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a more challenging entity, in part because its pathology is poorly understood. Diagnosis is often based on exclusion of other urologic conditions (e.g., voiding dysfunction, bladder cancer) in association with its presentation. Commonly used medications include antimicrobials, alpha blockers, and anti-inflammatory agents, but the effectiveness of these agents has not been supported in clinical trials. Small studies provide limited support for the use of nonpharmacologic modalities. Asymptomatic prostatitis is an incidental finding in a patient being evaluated for other urologic problems.

Radiologic Evaluation of Chronic Neck Pain - Article

ABSTRACT: For many years, there were no guidelines for evaluating patients with chronic neck pain. However, in the past 15 years, considerable research has led to recommendations regarding whiplash-associated disorders. This article summarizes the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria for chronic neck pain. Imaging plays an important role in evaluating patients with chronic neck pain. Five radiographic views (anteroposterior, lateral, open-mouth, and both oblique views) are recommended for all patients with chronic neck pain with or without a history of trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging should be performed in patients with chronic neurologic signs or symptoms, regardless of radiographic findings. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating ligamentous and membranous abnormalities in persons with whiplash-associated disorders is controversial. If there is a contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography myelography is recommended. Patients with normal radiographic findings and no neurologic signs or symptoms, or patients with radiographic evidence of spondylosis and no neurologic findings, need no further imaging studies.

Evaluation of Microcytosis - Article

ABSTRACT: Microcytosis is typically an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients who received a complete blood count for other reasons. The condition is defined as a mean corpuscular volume of less than 80 ┬Ám3 (80 fL) in adults. The most common causes of microcytosis are iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait. Other diagnoses to consider include anemia of chronic disease, lead toxicity, and sideroblastic anemia. Serum ferritin measurement is the first laboratory test recommended in the evaluation of microcytosis. Low ferritin levels suggest iron deficiency. Once a presumptive diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia has been made, an underlying source for the deficiency should be determined. Iron deficiency anemia in adults is presumed to be caused by blood loss; the most common source of bleeding is the gastrointestinal tract. The possibility of gastrointestinal malignancy must be considered. If the serum ferritin level is not initially low, further evaluation should include total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation level, serum iron level, and possibly hemoglobin electrophoresis. Anemia of chronic disease is suggested with low iron levels and decreased total iron-binding capacity. Patients with beta-thalassemia trait usually have elevated levels of hemoglobin A2.

Health Coaching for Patients With Chronic Illness - Feature

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