Items in FPM with MESH term: Clinical Competence

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 Next

Dermoscopy: An Invaluable Tool for Evaluating Skin Lesions - Editorials

Managing Pain at the End of Life - Editorials

Culturally Competent Family Medicine: Transforming Clinical Practice and Ourselves - Editorials

Who Should Care for Patients with HIV/AIDS? - Editorials

Determining Eligibility for Gastric Bypass Surgery - Curbside Consultation

Current Understanding of Tendinopathies and Treatment Options - Editorials

Envenomations: An Overview of Clinical Toxinology for the Primary Care Physician - Article

ABSTRACT: About 4,000 to 6,000 venomous snakebites occur each year in the United States. Although these envenomations (also known as envenomings) are rarely fatal, about 70 percent require antivenom therapy. Few evidence-based guidelines are available for the management of envenomation. Antivenom therapy is the cornerstone of management for hemorrhagic or coagulopathic envenomation from pit vipers (with or without paralytic features), and for paralytic envenomation from coral snakes. Early intubation and ventilation may be required after bites from pit vipers whose venoms contain presynaptic neurotoxins. Although relatively controversial, antivenom therapy seems to be effective for the management of severe envenomation from widow spiders. Conversely, little evidence supports any specific management strategy for necrotic envenomation from recluse spiders. Cytotoxic fish stings, cnidarian stings, and traumatic penetrative envenomation by stingrays are typically managed symptomatically. Private collection of nonnative venomous animals in the United States is another source of medical risk.

Breaking Bad News - Article

ABSTRACT: Breaking bad news is one of a physician's most difficult duties, yet medical education typically offers little formal preparation for this daunting task. Without proper training, the discomfort and uncertainty associated with breaking bad news may lead physicians to emotionally disengage from patients. Numerous study results show that patients generally desire frank and empathetic disclosure of a terminal diagnosis or other bad news. Focused training in communication skills and techniques to facilitate breaking bad news has been demonstrated to improve patient satisfaction and physician comfort. Physicians can build on the following simple mnemonic, ABCDE, to provide hope and healing to patients receiving bad news: Advance preparation--arrange adequate time and privacy, confirm medical facts, review relevant clinical data, and emotionally prepare for the encounter. Building a therapeutic relationship-identify patient preferences regarding the disclosure of bad news. Communicating well-determine the patient's knowledge and understanding of the situation, proceed at the patient's pace, avoid medical jargon or euphemisms, allow for silence and tears, and answer questions. Dealing with patient and family reactions-assess and respond to emotional reactions and empathize with the patient. Encouraging/validating emotions--offer realistic hope based on the patient's goals and deal with your own needs.

Breaking Bad News: The Many Roles of the Family Physician - Editorials

Universal Screening for Hearing Loss in Newborns - Putting Prevention into Practice

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 Next


Information From Industry