Items in FPM with MESH term: Depression

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

Translating a Guideline into Practice: The USPSTF Recommendations on Screening for Depression in Adults - Editorials

The Geriatric Assessment - Article

ABSTRACT: The geriatric assessment is a multidimensional, multidisciplinary assessment designed to evaluate an older person’s functional ability, physical health, cognition and mental health, and socioenvironmental circumstances. It is usually initiated when the physician identifies a potential problem. Specific elements of physical health that are evaluated include nutrition, vision, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, and balance. The geriatric assessment aids in the diagnosis of medical conditions; development of treatment and follow-up plans; coordination of management of care; and evaluation of long-term care needs and optimal placement. The geriatric assessment differs from a standard medical evaluation by including nonmedical domains; by emphasizing functional capacity and quality of life; and, often, by incorporating a multidisciplinary team. It usually yields a more complete and relevant list of medical problems, functional problems, and psychosocial issues. Well-validated tools and survey instruments for evaluating activities of daily living, hearing, fecal and urinary continence, balance, and cognition are an important part of the geriatric assessment. Because of the demands of a busy clinical practice, most geriatric assessments tend to be less comprehensive and more problem-directed. When multiple concerns are presented, the use of a “rolling” assessment over several visits should be considered.

Screening for Depression in Adults - Putting Prevention into Practice

American Psychiatric Association Issues a Practice Guideline on Dementia - Special Medical Reports

Consensus Statement Update on Depression in Late Life Is Issued by the NIH - Special Medical Reports

Pros and Cons of Genetic Screening for Breast Cancer - Editorials

Pain, Depression and Survival - Editorials

Clinical Review of Recent Findings on the Awareness, Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression - Practice Guidelines

Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Family Practice Patients - Editorials

Screening for Depression - Article

ABSTRACT: In the United States, depression affects up to 9 percent of patients and accounts for more than $43 billion in medical care costs. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening in adolescents and adults in clinical practices that have systems in place to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment, and follow-up. It does not recommend for or against screening for depression in children seven to 11 years of age or screening for suicide risk in the general population. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-2 and PHQ-9 are commonly used and validated screening tools. The PHQ-2 has a 97 percent sensitivity and 67 percent specificity in adults, whereas the PHQ-9 has a 61 percent sensitivity and 94 percent specificity in adults. If the PHQ-2 is positive for depression, the PHQ-9 should be administered; in older adults, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale is also an appropriate follow-up test. If these screening tests are positive for depression, further evaluation is needed to confirm that the patient’s symptoms meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders’ criteria for diagnosis.

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next


Information From Industry