Items in FPM with MESH term: Health Promotion

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Reinventing Family Medicine - Editorial

Promoting and Prescribing Exercise in the Elderly - Article

ABSTRACT: Regular exercise provides a myriad of health benefits in older adults, including improvements in blood pressure, diabetes, lipid profile, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and neurocognitive function. Regular physical activity is also associated with decreased mortality and age-related morbidity in older adults. Despite this, up to 75 percent of older Americans are insufficiently active to achieve these health benefits. Few contraindications to exercise exist and almost all older persons can benefit from additional physical activity. The exercise prescription consists of three components: aerobic exercise, strength training, and balance and flexibility. Physicians play a key role in motivating older patients and advising them regarding their physical limitations and/or comorbidities. Motivating patients to begin exercise is best achieved by focusing on individual patient goals, concerns, and barriers to exercise. Strategies include the "stages of change" model, individualized behavioral therapy, and an active lifestyle. To increase long-term compliance, the exercise prescription should be straightforward, fun, and geared toward a patient's individual health needs, beliefs, and goals.

Discharge Procedures for Healthy Newborns - Article

ABSTRACT: Physicians should use a checklist to facilitate discussions with new parents before discharging their healthy newborn from the hospital. The checklist should include information on breastfeeding, warning signs of illness, and ways to keep the child healthy and safe. Physicians can encourage breastfeeding by giving parents written information on hunger and feeding indicators, stool and urine patterns, and proper breastfeeding techniques. Physicians also should emphasize that infants should never be given honey or bottles of water before they are one year of age. Parents should be advised of treatments for common infant complaints such as constipation, be aware of signs and symptoms of more serious illnesses such as jaundice and lethargy, and know how to properly care for the umbilical cord and genital areas. Physicians should provide guidance on how to keep the baby safe in the crib (e.g., placing the baby on his or her back) and in the car (e.g., using a car seat that faces the rear of the car). It is also important to schedule a follow-up appointment for the infant.

Why Can't I Get My Patients to Exclusively Breastfeed Their Babies? - Curbside Consultation

Improved Breastfeeding Success Through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative - Editorials

Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding - Editorials

Children, Physical Activity, and Public Health: Another Call to Action - Editorials

Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care to Promote Physical Activity: Recommendations and Rationale - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Promoting Physical Activity in the Family Practice Setting - Editorials

Behavioral Counseling in Primary Care to Promote a Healthy Diet - Putting Prevention into Practice

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