Items in FPM with MESH term: Influenza, Human

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 Next

Vaccines for Preventing Influenza in Healthy Children - Cochrane for Clinicians

Vaccines for Preventing Influenza in Older Patients - Cochrane for Clinicians

N-Acetylcysteine: Multiple Clinical Applications - Article

ABSTRACT: N-acetylcysteine is the acetylated variant of the amino acid L-cysteine and is widely used as the specific antidote for acetaminophen overdose. Other applications for N-acetylcysteine supplementation supported by scientific evidence include prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, prevention of contrast-induced kidney damage during imaging procedures, attenuation of illness from the influenza virus when started before infection, treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, and treatment of infertility in patients with clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome. Preliminary studies suggest that N-acetylcysteine may also have a role as a cancer chemopreventive, an adjunct in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori, and prophylaxis of gentamicin-induced hearing loss in patients on renal dialysis.

Influenza Management Guide 2009-2010 - Editorials

Preparing Your Office for an Infectious Disease Epidemic - Feature

Neuraminidase Inhibitors for Influenza Treatment and Prevention in Healthy Adults - Cochrane for Clinicians

Influenza Vaccination of Health Care Personnel Working with Older Patients - Cochrane for Clinicians

Management of Influenza - Article

ABSTRACT: Influenza is a contagious airborne viral illness characterized by abrupt onset of symptoms. Fever, myalgia, headache, rhinitis, sore throat, and cough are commonly reported symptoms. The diagnosis should be made clinically, and the decision to begin antiviral therapy should not be delayed for laboratory confirmation of influenza. The 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus is expected to continue to circulate during the 2010-2011 season, but it is not certain whether it will replace or cocirculate with seasonal influenza A subtypes that have been circulating since 1977. The 2009 H1N1 virus is largely resistant to adamantanes, but it is sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir. Neuraminidase inhibitors have modest effectiveness in reducing influenza-related symptoms in patients at low risk of complications. Patients at high risk of complications, including pregnant women, should be treated with antiviral agents, preferably within 48 hours of symptom onset. Family physicians should follow guidelines from the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention when treating patients with influenza or influenza-like symptoms.

Influenza Management Guide 2010-2011 - Editorials

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Issues Recommendations for the 1998-99 Influenza Season - Special Medical Reports

Pages: Previous 1 2 3 4 Next


Information From Industry