Items in FPM with MESH term: Otitis Media

Pages: Previous 1 2

Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for URIs in Children: Part I. Otitis Media and Acute Sinusitis - Article

ABSTRACT: Five conditions--otitis media, acute sinusitis, cough, pharyngitis and the common cold--account for most of the outpatient use of antibiotics in the United States. The first part of this two-part article presents guidelines that encourage physicians to make an appropriate distinction between acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion, to use shorter courses of antibiotic therapy in uncomplicated cases of otitis media and to limit prophylaxis to recurrence as defined strictly by number of episodes. Sinusitis in younger children is difficult to distinguish from the common cold, and the criterion for use of antibiotics should be duration of symptoms.

Acute Otitis Media Caused by Resistant Pneumococci - Editorials

Controversy in Otitis Media Management: Should We Follow the CDC Recommendations? - Editorials

Tympanocentesis: To Tap or Not to Tap - Editorials

Topical Fluoroquinolones for Eye and Ear - Article

ABSTRACT: Topical fluoroquinolones are now available for use in the eye and ear. Their broad spectrum of activity includes the common eye and ear pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For the treatment of acute otitis externa, these agents are as effective as previously available otic preparations. For the treatment of otitis media with tympanic membrane perforation, topical fluoroquinolones are effective and safe. These preparations are approved for use in children, and lack of ototoxicity permits prolonged administration when necessary. Topical fluoroquinolones are not appropriate for the treatment of uncomplicated conjunctivitis where narrower spectrum agents suffice; they represent a simplified regimen for the treatment of bacterial keratitis (corneal ulcers). When administered topically, fluoroquinolones are well tolerated and offer convenient dosing schedules. Currently, bacterial resistance appears limited.

Short Course of Antibiotics for Acute Otitis Media Treatment - Cochrane for Clinicians

Should Children with Acute Otitis Media Routinely Be Treated with Antibiotics? Yes: Routine Treatment Makes Sense for Symptomatic, Emotional, and Economic Reasons - Editorials

Should Children with Acute Otitis Media Routinely be Treated with Antibiotics? No: Most Children Older Than Two Years Do Not Require Antibiotics - Editorials

Otitis Media: Diagnosis and Treatment - Article

ABSTRACT: Acute otitis media is diagnosed in patients with acute onset, presence of middle ear effusion, physical evidence of middle ear inflammation, and symptoms such as pain, irritability, or fever. Acute otitis media is usually a complication of eustachian tube dysfunction that occurs during a viral upper respiratory tract infection. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are the most common organisms isolated from middle ear fluid. Management of acute otitis media should begin with adequate analgesia. Antibiotic therapy can be deferred in children two years or older with mild symptoms. High-dose amoxicillin (80 to 90 mg per kg per day) is the antibiotic of choice for treating acute otitis media in patients who are not allergic to penicillin. Children with persistent symptoms despite 48 to 72 hours of antibiotic therapy should be reexamined, and a second-line agent, such as amoxicillin/clavulanate, should be used if appropriate. Otitis media with effusion is defined as middle ear effusion in the absence of acute symptoms. Antibiotics, decongestants, or nasal steroids do not hasten the clearance of middle ear fluid and are not recommended. Children with evidence of anatomic damage, hearing loss, or language delay should be referred to an otolaryngologist.

Pages: Previous 1 2


Information From Industry