Items in FPM with MESH term: Patient Participation

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Health Literacy: The Gap Between Physicians and Patients - Article

ABSTRACT: Health literacy is basic reading and numerical skills that allow a person to function in the health care environment. Even though most adults read at an eighth-grade level, and 20 percent of the population reads at or below a fifth-grade level, most health care materials are written at a 10th-grade level. Older patients are particularly affected because their reading and comprehension abilities are influenced by their cognition and their vision and hearing status. Inadequate health literacy can result in difficulty accessing health care, following instructions from a physician, and taking medication properly. Patients with inadequate health literacy are more likely to be hospitalized than patients with adequate skills. Patients understand medical information better when spoken to slowly, simple words are used, and a restricted amount of information is presented. For optimal comprehension and compliance, patient education material should be written at a sixth-grade or lower reading level, preferably including pictures and illustrations. All patients prefer reading medical information written in dear and concise language. Physicians should be alert to this problem because most patients are unwilling to admit that they have literacy problems.

Supporting Self-management in Patients with Chronic Illness - Article

ABSTRACT: Support of patient self-management is a key component of effective chronic illness care and improved patient outcomes. Self-management support goes beyond traditional knowledge-based patient education to include processes that develop patient problem-solving skills, improve self-efficacy, and support application of knowledge in real-life situations that matter to patients. This approach also encompasses system-focused changes in the primary care environment. Family physicians can support patient self-management by structuring patient-physician interactions to identify problems from the patient perspective, making office environment changes that remove self-management barriers, and providing education individually and through available community self-management resources. The emerging evidence supports the implementation of practice strategies that are conducive to patient self-management and improved patient outcomes among chronically ill patients.

The Power of Two: Improving Patient Safety Through Better Physician-Patient Communication - Improving Patient Care

Encounter Forms for Better Preventive Visits - Feature

The Fine Art of Refusal - Balancing Act

The Complete Physical - Curbside Consultation

Cutting Back on High-Dosage Narcotics - Curbside Consultation

The Right to Know--But at What Cost? - Curbside Consultation

The Role of Literacy in Health and Health Care - Editorials

Patient-Choice Cesarean Delivery - Curbside Consultation

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