Items in FPM with MESH term: Physical Examination

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Diagnosis and Initial Management of Dysmenorrhea - Article

ABSTRACT: Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common causes of pelvic pain. It negatively affects patients’ quality of life and sometimes results in activity restriction. A history and physical examination, including a pelvic examination in patients who have had vaginal intercourse, may reveal the cause. Primary dysmenorrhea is menstrual pain in the absence of pelvic pathology. Abnormal uterine bleeding, dyspareunia, noncyclic pain, changes in intensity and duration of pain, and abnormal pelvic examination findings suggest underlying pathology (secondary dysmenorrhea) and require further investigation. Transvaginal ultrasonography should be performed if secondary dysmenorrhea is suspected. Endometriosis is the most common cause of secondary dysmenorrhea. Symptoms and signs of adenomyosis include dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, and a uniformly enlarged uterus. Management options for primary dysmenorrhea include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and hormonal contraceptives. Hormonal contraceptives are the first-line treatment for dysmenorrhea caused by endometriosis. Topical heat, exercise, and nutritional supplementation may be beneficial in patients who have dysmenorrhea; however, there is not enough evidence to support the use of yoga, acupuncture, or massage.

A Comprehensive Newborn Exam: Part II. Skin, Trunk, Extremities, Neurologic - Article

ABSTRACT: Skin findings are common during the newborn examination. Although these findings are often benign, it is important to visualize the entire skin surface to distinguish these findings and appropriately reassure parents. The chest should be observed for symmetric movement, pectus excavatum, pectus carinatum, prominent xiphoid, or breast tissue. The infant should be as relaxed as possible so that the physician can more easily detect any abdominal masses, which are often renal in origin. A single umbilical artery may be associated with another congenital abnormality, especially renal anomalies, and intrauterine growth restriction and prematurity. Signs of ambiguous genitalia include clitoromegaly and fused labia in girls, and bilateral undescended testes, a micropenis, or a bifid scrotum in boys. Sacral dimples do not warrant further evaluation if they are less than 0.5 cm in diameter, are located within 2.5 cm of the anal verge, and are not associated with cutaneous markers; dimples that do not fit these criteria require ultrasonography to evaluate for spinal dysraphism. Brachial plexus injuries are most common in newborns who are large for gestational age, and physical therapy may be required to achieve normal function. Patients with abnormal findings on Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers should be evaluated further for hip dysplasia. It is also important to assess newborns for tone and confirm the presence of normal primitive reflexes.

A Comprehensive Newborn Exam: Part I. General, Head and Neck, Cardiopulmonary - Article

ABSTRACT: A comprehensive newborn examination involves a systematic inspection. A Ballard score uses physical and neurologic characteristics to assess gestational age. Craniosynostosis is caused by premature fusion of the sutures, and 20% of children with this condition have a genetic mutation or syndrome. The red reflex assessment is normal if there is symmetry in both eyes, without opacities, white spots, or dark spots. If the red reflex findings are abnormal or the patient has a family history of pertinent eye disorders, consultation with an ophthalmologist is warranted. Newborns with low-set ears should be evaluated for a genetic condition. Renal ultrasonography should be performed only in patients with isolated ear anomalies, such as preauricular pits or cup ears, if they are accompanied by other malformations or significant family history. If ankyloglossia is detected, a frenotomy may be considered if it impacts breastfeeding. The neck should be examined for full range of motion because uncorrected torticollis can lead to plagiocephaly and ear misalignment. Proper auscultation is crucial for evaluation of the bronchopulmonary circulation with close observation for signs of respiratory distress, including tachypnea, nasal flaring, grunting, retractions, and cyanosis. Benign murmurs are often present in the first hours of life. Pulse oximetry should be performed in a systematic fashion before discharge.

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