Items in FPM with MESH term: Physicians, Family

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Are You Thinking Right? - The Last Word

Five Communication Strategies to Promote Self-Management of Chronic Illness - Feature

Breaking Bad News - Article

ABSTRACT: Breaking bad news is one of a physician's most difficult duties, yet medical education typically offers little formal preparation for this daunting task. Without proper training, the discomfort and uncertainty associated with breaking bad news may lead physicians to emotionally disengage from patients. Numerous study results show that patients generally desire frank and empathetic disclosure of a terminal diagnosis or other bad news. Focused training in communication skills and techniques to facilitate breaking bad news has been demonstrated to improve patient satisfaction and physician comfort. Physicians can build on the following simple mnemonic, ABCDE, to provide hope and healing to patients receiving bad news: Advance preparation--arrange adequate time and privacy, confirm medical facts, review relevant clinical data, and emotionally prepare for the encounter. Building a therapeutic relationship-identify patient preferences regarding the disclosure of bad news. Communicating well-determine the patient's knowledge and understanding of the situation, proceed at the patient's pace, avoid medical jargon or euphemisms, allow for silence and tears, and answer questions. Dealing with patient and family reactions-assess and respond to emotional reactions and empathize with the patient. Encouraging/validating emotions--offer realistic hope based on the patient's goals and deal with your own needs.

Breaking Bad News: The Many Roles of the Family Physician - Editorials

'Just-in-Time' Business Education for Family Physicians - Opinion

Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much: An Evidence-Based Guide for Primary Care Physicians - Article

ABSTRACT: Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality, but few heavy drinkers receive treatment. Primary care physicians are in a position to address heavy drinking and alcohol use disorders with patients, and can do so quickly and effectively. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has published a guide for physicians that offers an evidence-based approach to screening, assessing, and treating alcohol use disorders in general health care settings. Screening can be performed by asking patients how many heavy drinking days they have per week. Assessing patients' willingness to change their drinking behaviors can guide treatment. Treatment recommendations should be presented in a clear, nonjudgmental way. Patients who are not alcohol-dependent may opt to reduce drinking to lower risk levels. Patients with alcohol dependence should receive pharmacotherapy and brief behavioral support, as well as disease management for chronic relapsing dependence. All patients with alcohol dependence should be encouraged to participate in community support groups

Title VII Is Criticial to the Community Health Center and National Health Service Corps Workforce - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

Family Physicians and Nursing Home Medicine: Forging a Partnership for Quality Care - Editorials

Income Disparities Shape Medical Student Specialty Choice - Graham Center Policy One-Pagers

How to Clean Up in Family Medicine - The Last Word

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