Items in FPM with MESH term: Infection Control

Health Effects of Garlic - Article

ABSTRACT: Garlic has long been used medicinally, most recently for its cardiovascular, antineoplastic, and antimicrobial properties. Sulfur compounds, including allicin, appear to be the active components in the root bulb of the garlic plant. Studies show significant but modest lipid-lowering effects and antiplatelet activity. Significant blood pressure reduction is not consistently noted. There is some evidence for antineoplastic activity and insufficient evidence for clinical antimicrobial activity. Side effects generally are mild and uncommon. Garlic appears to have no effect on drug metabolism, but patients taking anticoagulants should be cautious. It seems prudent to stop taking high dosages of garlic seven to 10 days before surgery because garlic can prolong bleeding time.

Prevention and Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases: An Update - Article

ABSTRACT: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently published revised guidelines for the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. One new treatment strategy is the use of azithromycin as a primary, rather than alternative, medication for pregnant women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection continues to increase in the United States; therefore, quinolones are no longer recommended for treatment of this infection. Expedited partner therapy gives physicians another option when addressing the need to treat partners of persons diagnosed with N. gonorrhoeae or C. trachomatis infection. Tinidazole is now available in the United States and can be used to manage trichomoniasis, including trichomoniasis resistant to metronidazole. Shorter courses of antiviral medication can be used for episodic therapy of recurrent genital herpes. Because of increasing resistance, close follow-up is required if azithromycin is used as an alternative treatment in the management of primary or secondary syphilis. Unexpected increases in the rates of lymphogranuloma venereum have occurred in The Netherlands, and physicians should remain vigilant for symptoms of this disease in the United States.

Evaluating the Febrile Patient with a Rash - Article

ABSTRACT: The differential diagnosis for febrile patients with a rash is extensive. Diseases that present with fever and rash are usually classified according to the morphology of the primary lesion. Rashes can be categorized as maculopapular (centrally and peripherally distributed), petechial, diffusely erythematous with desquamation, vesiculobullous-pustular and nodular. Potential causes include viruses, bacteria, spirochetes, rickettsiae, medications and rheumatologic diseases. A thorough history and a careful physical examination are essential to making a correct diagnosis. Although laboratory studies can be useful in confirming the diagnosis, test results often are not available immediately. Because the severity of these illnesses can vary from minor (roseola) to life-threatening (meningococcemia), the family physician must make prompt management decisions regarding empiric therapy. Hospitalization, isolation and antimicrobial therapy often must be considered when a patient presents with fever and a rash.

How to Manage a Pertussis Outbreak in Your Practice - Feature

AAP Issues Recommendations on Infection Control in Physicians' Offices - Practice Guidelines

Should Doctors Call in Sick? - Curbside Consultation

Gowning in Newborn and Special-Care Nurseries - Cochrane for Clinicians

CDC Releases Updated Plan for Emerging Infectious Diseases - Special Medical Reports

Confronting Antimicrobial Resistance: A Shared Goal of Family Physicians and the CDC - Editorials

Clinical Briefs - Clinical Briefs


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