Items in FPM with MESH term: Risk Assessment

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Global Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: Assessment and Application - Article

ABSTRACT: Coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death in the United States. The conventional risk factor approach to primary prevention excludes many patients who could benefit from preventive therapies. A global risk approach allows more accurate estimates of risk to guide clinical primary prevention efforts. Global risk of coronary heart disease is a calculation of the absolute risk of having a coronary heart disease event (e.g., death, myocardial infarction) over a specified period. It is based on an empiric equation that combines major risk factors, such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels. When physicians know a patient’s global risk of coronary heart disease, they are more likely to prescribe risk-reducing therapies such as antihypertensives, statins, and aspirin. In addition, patients who know their risk level are more likely to initiate risk-reducing therapies. Many tools are available to estimate global risk, including several Web-based calculators. In the United States, tools based on the Framingham Heart Study are recommended.

Evidence for Global CHD Risk Calculation: Risk Assessment Alone Does Not Change Outcomes - Editorials

Screening and Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder in Children and Adolescents - Putting Prevention into Practice

Is Your Practice at Risk for Fraud? - Feature

Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment - Putting Prevention into Practice

Heat-Related Illness - Article

ABSTRACT: Heat-related illness is a set of preventable conditions ranging from mild forms (e.g., heat exhaustion, heat cramps) to potentially fatal heat stroke. Hot and humid conditions challenge cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms. Once core temperature reaches 104°F (40°C), cellular damage occurs, initiating a cascade of events that may lead to organ failure and death. Early recognition of symptoms and accurate measurement of core temperature are crucial to rapid diagnosis. Milder forms of heat-related illness are manifested by symptoms such as headache, weakness, dizziness, and an inability to continue activity. These are managed by supportive measures including hydration and moving the patient to a cool place. Hyperthermia and central nervous system symptoms should prompt an evaluation for heat stroke. Initial treatments should focus on lowering core temperature through cold water immersion. Applying ice packs to the head, neck, axilla, and groin is an alternative. Additional measures include transporting the patient to a cool environment, removing excess clothing, and intravenous hydration. Delayed access to cooling is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with heat stroke. Identification of at-risk groups can help physicians and community health agencies provide preventive measures.

Screening for Osteoporosis: Recommendation Statement - U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Screening for Osteoporosis - Putting Prevention into Practice

Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy - FPIN's Clinical Inquiries

Overuse of Computed Tomography and Associated Risks - Editorials

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