Health Groups Release 2010 Immunization Schedules

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   
Thursday, January 21, 2010

Contact:
Megan Moriarty
Public Relations Strategist
American Academy of Family Physicians
(800) 274-2237 Ext. 5223
mmoriarty@aafp.org

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ 2010 recommended adult, adolescent and childhood immunization schedules include new options for the human papillomavirus vaccination in adults as well as the addition of the H1N1 influenza vaccination among those suggested for children.

The ACIP annually reviews the recommended immunization schedules to ensure that they best reflect current recommendations for the licensed vaccines.The ACIP produced the adult immunization schedule in conjunction with the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians, and the childhood and adolescent schedule in conjunction with the AAFP, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The newly approved 2010 adult immunization schedule includes several changes.

  • The meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) is preferred for adults ages 55 and younger. The meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4) is preferred for adults 56 and older. Revaccination with MCV4 after five years is recommended for adults previously vaccinated with MCV4 or MPSV4 who remain at high risk for meningococcal infection, such as those with asplenia.
  • The hepatitis A footnote has been updated to include an indication for unvaccinated people who anticipate close contact with an international adoptee from a country where hepatitis A is endemic.
  • The hepatitis B footnote has been updated to include scheduling information for the three-dose vaccine series.
  • Two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella, or MMR, vaccine are now recommended for unvaccinated health care workers who were born before 1957 during an outbreak of measles or mumps. One dose of MMR is recommended for unvaccinated health care workers who were born before 1957 during an outbreak of rubella.
  • A bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2) was licensed by the Food and Drug Administration for use in females in October 2009. The ACIP now recommends vaccination of females with either HPV2 or the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). HPV4 was licensed for use in males in October 2009 and the ACIP issued a permissive recommendation for use in males.

The 2010 childhood and adolescent schedules note the ACIP’s preference for use of combination vaccines over separate injections of equivalent component vaccines.

Other changes in the childhood and adolescent immunization schedules include the following.

  • New recommendations for flu vaccinations include the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine.
  • Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) is now recommended for children who remain at increased risk for meningococcal disease. Children should be revaccinated after three years if the first dose was administered at age 2 through 6 years, or after five years if the first dose was administered at age 7 or older.
  • There are also new recommendations for the recently licensed HPV2 vaccine in adolescent females and the HPV4 vaccine in adolescent males, similar to those for adults.
  • For the inactivated poliovirus vaccine, the last dose in the series now is recommended to be administered on or after a child’s fourth birthday and at least six months after the previous dose. If four doses are administered before age 4 years, a fifth dose should be administered at age 4 through 6 years.

The 2010 adult immunization schedule can be found here. The 2010 childhood immunization schedule can be found here, the 2010 adolescent immunization schedule can be found here and the 2010 childhood and adolescent catch-up schedule can be found here.

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Founded in 1947, the AAFP represents 124,900 physicians and medical students nationwide. It is the only medical society devoted solely to primary care.

Family physicians conduct approximately one in five office visits -- that’s 192 million visits annually or 48 percent more than the next most visited medical specialty. Today, family physicians provide more care for America’s underserved and rural populations than any other medical specialty. Family medicine’s cornerstone is an ongoing, personal patient-physician relationship focused on integrated care.

To learn more about the specialty of family medicine, the AAFP's positions(5 page PDF) on issues and clinical care, and for downloadable multi-media highlighting family medicine, visit
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