Meet the FMIG Network Student Leaders

The FMIG Network Regional Coordinators can help you with family medicine and FMIG-related questions. Learn more about the Regional Coordinators and their unique experiences with family medicine.

Regional Coordinators and SNMA Student Liaison

Region 1 -- Jacqueline Huynh

Email: jnhuynh@email.arizona.edu
Hometown: Phoenix, Arizona
School: University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson
Year: MS3
Follow Jacqueline on Twitter: @jnthuynh(twitter.com)

Jacqueline served as co-chair of her FMIG, coordinating noontime talks, procedural workshops, and community service activities. She also introduced medical students to the business side of medicine in her role as president of her school's College of Medicine Business Association. In her role as Region 1 Coordinator, Jacqueline seeks to increase communication between schools and strengthen FMIGs through more activities.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
I spent a lot of time during high school and college interpreting medical information for my grandparents and other family members and helping them navigate the health care system. During that time, I became fascinated with how medical problems occurred; a patient’s medical condition was like a mystery to be investigated and solved! I loved studying about diseases and then helping people understand what was happening, as I had done for my family.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG?
Our FMIG is one of the most active organizations on campus, and I admit, all these procedural workshops worked in catching my interest as a first-year medical student! When elections came around, I wanted to be a leader to help provide even more events and procedures, but I never dreamed I would become co-chair! I became a leader because I wanted others to have the chance to experience the diverse opportunities family medicine could offer. My passion was education, and I hoped to educate others about the flexibility and variety the field of family medicine provides.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
Family medicine is the one field that encompasses all ages and all organ systems, allowing its practitioners to practice anywhere and everywhere! Although it is very diverse, the field is flexible enough for each physician to tailor the practice to their own preference. Practicing family medicine is an intellectual challenge; the diverse population and problems serve as a stimulus to keep learning and striving to do our best by our patients.

What’s your favorite thing about family medicine?
My favorite aspects of family medicine are its diversity of patient population and medical conditions; the flexibility of lifestyle and practice options; and the intellectual challenge it provides. I love the allure of caring for a patient from prenatal care, to birth, through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood to death.

Region 2 -- Lauren Segelhorst

Email: lsegel2@uic.edu
Hometown: Mascoutah, Illinois
School: University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine
Year in School: MS2
Follow Lauren on Twitter: @aloochaat28(twitter.com)

Lauren joined her school's FMIG as a first-year student. Her participation in the group intensified her interest in family medicine, and she took over as FMIG president the following year. She also served on the board of an organization that provides free health clinic services to the uninsured in Chicago. As Region 2 Coordinator, Lauren hopes to provide FMIGs in the Midwest with the resources needed to address health disparities and demonstrate the importance of family medicine in the health care system.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
I was kind of a science nerd as a kid. I began gravitating toward the medical field in high school, and the more I learned about the responsibilities of a physician compared to other medical professionals, the more I knew I wanted a career as a physician. Eventually I realized that beyond that, I want to be a physician who is deeply connected with my patients.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG?
When I entered medical school, primary care was toward the bottom of my list of possible career paths. An excellent panel of primary care physicians – mostly family physicians – during my M1 orientation week completely changed my perspective. I was so excited to learn more about this potential career that I had completely disregarded that I sought out any opportunity to participate in FMIG events. I enjoyed it so much as an M1 that as an M2, I am now president of our FMIG.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
A career as a family physician is anything but simple and repetitive. It is challenging, rewarding, and truly requires the physician to be well-rounded in terms of medical knowledge and interpersonal skills. There are few things more valuable than being able to promote health and eliminate disease by building high-quality, lasting relationships with patients.

What is your favorite thing about family medicine?
In medicine, the idea has been resurfacing that the role of a physician should be to treat the whole person, as opposed to treating just the disease. I could not agree more with this philosophy, and I believe that the possibilities for embodying it are endless. Of all avenues in medicine, family medicine undoubtedly provides the best setting in which to practice this holistic philosophy.

Region 3 -- Carina Brown

Email: cbrown10@hmc.psu.edu
Hometown: Hughesville, Pennsylvania
Medical School: Penn State University College of Medicine
Year in School: MS3
Follow Carina on Twitter: @cmbrown928(twitter.com)

As co-president of her FMIG, Carina helped launch a program that brought together law students and medical students to discuss issues such as end-of-life care, health care reform, and medical malpractice. She also organized a Primary Care Day to teach college students about the importance of primary care. Carina will build on her FMIG experience in her role as Region 3 Coordinator by connecting FMIG leaders and developing vaulable National Conference programming.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
My grandmother first sparked my interest in medicine. As a family physician, she acted as the medical director of a local nursing home. Her stories of caring and healing moved me. I hoped to be part of that healing process one day.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG?
I became involved in FMIG as a first-year student. After anatomy had finally finished, I attended a lecture sponsored by FMIG entitled "Mystery Diagnosis." I was amazed by the presentation. A family medicine resident presented a case to an attending in front of large group of students. With the help of the attending, the audience solved the case! I knew that I wanted to be part of a such fun, innovative, forward-thinking group.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
A career in family medicine means a career in healing the whole person. If you like to be challenged, enjoy learning something new every day, and blazing your own path, try family medicine on for a fit.

What's your favorite thing about family medicine?
I love the diversity within family medicine. You can go from a 2-year-old well visit, to a congestive heart failure exacerbation in an elderly man in the next room, and finally onto examine a woman who is 30 weeks pregnant. No one has more excitement in their day than family physicians.

Region 4 -- Cleveland Piggott, Jr.

Email: cleveland_piggott@med.unc.edu
Hometown: Suwanee, GA
Medical School: University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Year in School: MPH/MS4
Follow Cleveland on Twitter: @capjr14(twitter.com)

Cleveland brings a passion for family medicine, public health, and advancing primary care to the Region 4 Coordinator role. He has served as co-president of the University of North Carolina FMIG, where he designed the group's website and helped establish the first-of-its-kind undergraduate FMIG. On the state level, he was a member of the North Carolina Academy of Family Physicians student board. Interested in improving health systems, Cleveland is also pursuing a Master of Public Health degree.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
My parents instilled in me a heart for service and caring for the underserved all my life. In high school, I fell in love with the biological sciences and the ability to use science to cause healing. Pursuing a career in medicine became a natural fit where I could combine my passion for science and serving others.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG?
My first experience with family medicine was senior year of college when I had a chance to go to a family medicine conference in California, and I was amazed with how much I enjoyed the experience. Because of this, I went to my first FMIG meeting at the beginning of my first year of medical school and really enjoyed it. That winter, I went to my state’s family medicine conference and fell in love with the people, subject material, and I knew I found my place in medicine. I became an FMIG co-president the next year and served as a student representative for my state chapter’s board of trustees during my third year of medical school. I became involved in FMIG to learn more about family medicine and help guide those who may be interested in the specialty find out if it was the right fit for them.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
There is nothing a family physician can’t do! A student's view of family medicine is often that one doctor he or she grew up going to or had on rotations, and the student does not have a good grasp of the enormous scope in family medicine and what family physicians are doing around the country. Delivering babies, running emergency rooms, working in intensive care units, and even performing surgery are just a few of the opportunities available in family medicine. Your scope in family medicine is only limited by your interests and the needs of your chosen patient population.

What’s your favorite thing about family medicine?
The relationships and not knowing what medical problem will be walking in the door. In family medicine, you can truly treat people from birth to grave and develop relationships with generations of families. Additionally, life is never boring, as the diversity and complexity of medical problems you see on a daily basis have an incredibly wide range, and you’re equipped to comprehensively tackle almost anything.

Region 5 -- Andrea Schuster

Email: ams8t7@health.missouri.edu
Hometown: Pilot Grove, Missouri
School: University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia
Year in School: MS4
Follow Andrea on Twitter: @AndreaMSchuster(twitter.com)

Andrea has been an active member of the University of Missouri's FMIG since she began medical school. As co-chair, she organized skills labs and planned informational lectures on family medicine topics. She brings a passion for primary care for rural populations to her role as Region 5 coordinator, and will work to improve FMIGs' community service, leadership development, and professional networking events.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
I have wanted to be a doctor since I was 5 years old because I admired the special and unique relationship my family had with my pediatrician when I was growing up. I wanted to be that physician people could depend on, no matter what time of night or day. Also, I grew up in a rural area in Missouri and experienced how inconvenient it can be to obtain high-quality health care in an underserved area. I decided to enter medical school so I could return to a rural area to practice and help bridge some of the gaps in health care access.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG? 
I entered medical school with the goal of becoming a pediatrician. However, after a rural family medicine rotation during the summer before my M2 year I changed my mind and decided to pursue a career in family medicine. I joined Mizzou's FMIG at the beginning of my M2 year and became involved in a variety of activities, and then became a co-chair of the Mizzou FMIG chapter as an M3.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
I wish every medical student understood the multitude of opportunities that are available to a family physician. As a family doctor, you can work in any location, perform procedures, and see a huge variety of conditions and age groups every day. It is a challenging and very rewarding field.

What’s your favorite thing about family medicine?
My favorite thing about family medicine is the ability to simultaneously form lasting relationships with patients, take care of entire families, and play a major role in the health of your community. I also love the diagnostic challenge and varied patient populations.

SNMA Student Liaison -- Alice Esame

Email: aliceesame@gmail.com
Hometown: Madison, Alabama
School: Howard University College of Medicine
Year in School: MS3
Follow Simon on Twitter: @AliceSNMA(twitter.com)

Alice has been a member of the executive board of the Student National Medical Association since her first year at Howard University College of Medicine, most recently serving as president. Through her involvement with SNMA and her school's FMIG, she has worked on free health care initiatives in the Washington, DC area. As the AAFP Student Liaison to the SNMA, Alice will communicate opportunities between the groups in support of her goal of using family medicine to help fix health care disparities.

Why did you decide to go to medical school?
My mother was a midwife growing up, which made medicine the first career I was ever exposed to. I saw the impact that my mother had in our community and wanted to be just like her. When I got older and really began to appreciate what it meant to be healthy, it became my goal to prevent people from getting sick.

How/why did you get involved with your FMIG?
I joined my FMIG so that I could learn more about the opportunities available in family medicine and in turn share what I'd learned with my peers.

What about family medicine do you wish every medical student understood?
I wish that every medical student understood that there are endless opportunities to be a stellar physician in family medicine. Family medicine isn't only medication refills. It is the core of medicine that presents a daily challenge to be an all-encompassing physician depending on which patient walks into your office that day.

What’s your favorite thing about family medicine?
The continuity of care. Being able to take a mother through her pregnancy and then care for both her and her child is very special. No other physician can have that effect on a family.