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Tuesday Jul 21, 2015

AAFP Advocacy Promotes Compassionate Care

On July 9, CMS released its proposed rule(www.cms.gov) for the 2016 Medicare physician fee schedule. As part of this rule, CMS is proposing to pay physicians for advanced care planning services -- better known as end-of-life counseling -- through two codes.

“CMS proposes to establish separate payment and a payment rate for two advance care planning services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by physicians and other practitioners," the agency said in the proposed rule. "The Medicare statute currently provides coverage for advance care planning under the 'Welcome to Medicare' visit available to all Medicare beneficiaries, but they may not need these services when they first enroll. Establishing separate payment for advance care planning codes provides beneficiaries and practitioners greater opportunity and flexibility to utilize these planning sessions at the most appropriate time for patients and their families.”

Under the proposed rule, CMS is proposing to pay for CPT codes 99497 and 99498. These codes, if implemented, will provide compensation for complex advanced care planning, which involves one or more meeting(s), lasting 30 minutes or more, during which the patient’s values and preferences are discussed and documented, and used to guide decisions regarding future care for serious illnesses. These consultations are voluntary on the part of the patient, and the patient may choose to include family members or caregivers in the meeting.  

The AAFP has long advocated for Medicare to pay for advanced care planning services, and we applaud CMS for including this policy in the proposed rule. It is long overdue, and we promptly communicated our support of this policy proposal in a press statement following the release of the proposed rule.

In 1789, Benjamin Franklin stated, “…in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” The problem is we, as a country, are much more comfortable having a conversation about taxes, than death. Conversations about death are difficult. They are especially difficult at the time that the outcome is imminent. However, as Mr. Franklin stated, death is certain. Our collective reluctance to discuss death doesn’t prevent it from happening; it only makes needed conversations and decisions harder.  

This issue has always been wrought with political undercurrents and challenges. In 2009, as part of the health care reform debate, our country was starting to have a serious conversation about the importance of patients, caregivers and physicians engaging in a meaningful conversation about death and, more importantly, how we as a society could begin to openly discuss those difficult decisions that each of us will ultimately face. Sadly, the political discourse of the day reduced these conversations to a ridiculous talking point comparing advanced care planning to “death panels.” Thankfully the mastermind of this dreaded talking point has seen her 15 minutes of fame expire.  

The AAFP played a prominent role in this policy being included in the 2016 proposed rule. In the years following health care reform, the AAFP worked closely with other physician and patient organizations to promote advanced care planning policies in the legislative and regulatory environments. We worked closely with Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., on his legislation, the Personalize Your Care Act and Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., and Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., on their Care Planning Act. We also worked closely with the Pew Charitable Trust as part of its Improving End-of-Life Care Initiative(www.pewtrusts.org) to develop and promote advanced care policies.  

In 2014, the Institute of Medicine issued a report, “Dying in America,” which cited payment for advanced care planning as one of its five recommendations. The report states that “payers and health care delivery organizations should adopt these standards and their supporting processes, and integrate them into assessments, care plans and the reporting of health care quality.” Building on the recommendations of the IOM, in May of this year, the AAFP joined more than 50 other organizations urging CMS to provide payment for advanced care planning services.

The importance of this policy is well understood. Demographics are rapidly changing, and our population is growing older. The aging of our population is to be celebrated, but it does present challenges. By 2050, the number of people who are 80 and older will triple, and the number of people in their 90s and 100s will quadruple. Roughly 6 percent of Medicare patients die each year, and they consume approximately 30 percent of Medicare resources. As noted earlier, death is certain.  

My question is this: How do we want the health care system to treat us or our loved ones in our final days and hours of life? I would suggest that there is not a more appropriate place for this conversation to take place than a family medicine practice. You are the trusted advisers and the facilitators of communication on these difficult issues with patients and their caregivers, and it is time that Medicare paid you for these services.

AAFP policy states, “supporting a patient’s care decisions at the end of life is part of the family physician’s responsibility in his or her partnership with the patient. The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) believes that each individual has the right to decide what medical treatment he or she will receive. This right includes decisions about what life-sustaining treatment should be provided at the end of his or her life.” If this proposed rule is finalized, we will have successfully aligned public policy with AAFP policy, and patient care will be improved.  

American Family Physician has volumes of resources on this topic that are well situated to assist you with end-of-life issues.

Posted at 07:00AM Jul 21, 2015 by Shawn Martin

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR



Shawn Martin, AAFP Senior Vice President of Advocacy, Practice Advancement and Policy.

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The opinions and views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent or reflect the opinions and views of the American Academy of Family Physicians. This blog is not intended to provide medical, financial, or legal advice. All comments are moderated and will be removed if they violate our Terms of Use.