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Wednesday Aug 26, 2015

Former 'Orphan' School Embraces Family Medicine to Drive Progress

When I was a student at Emory University School of Medicine, it was a so-called orphan school, meaning it did not have a family medicine department. In fact, I was one of the few students in my class who chose family medicine after graduation, but that is a story unto itself.

It was special, more than 30 years later, to be invited back to my alma mater recently to see what is happening in family medicine there and to be a part of the Atlanta school's new direction.

© 2015 Wilford Harewood/Emory University
An Emory University medical student asks a question during a panel discussion about primary care. Emory launched its chapter of Primary Care Progress this month.

Emory recently launched a chapter of Primary Care Progress(primarycareprogress.org), an organization that seeks to not only promote primary care but also develop a new generation of leaders. My invitation to participate in a launch event came about, in part, because of the Academy's efforts to build student interest in family medicine. For example, during the recent AAFP National Conference of Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students, AAFP President-elect Wanda Filer, M.D., M.B.A., led a session about leadership in primary care with Andrew Morris-Singer, M.D., the president and founder of Primary Care Progress.

Reaching out to our students and residents and fostering relationships is vital to building our workforce pipeline. During National Conference, I happened to walk up to a group of students who turned out to be the contingency from Emory. These extremely passionate and engaging students were thrilled to be at the event and told me they were strongly considering family medicine residency.

It's also worth noting that Ambar Kulshreshtha, M.D., Ph.D. -- the resident representative to the AAFP's Commission on Quality and Practice -- was a chief resident at Emory last year and is now a member of the school's faculty. Our specialty is truly about family and relationships.

During my visit to Emory, I met many incredible folks dedicated to moving family medicine forward at this storied institution. I was introduced to an invigorated Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, and I spent a great deal of time with many in leadership who are involved with medical student and resident education. I gave a presentation about the patient-centered medical home that drew residents, faculty and staff, as well as some medical students. I was impressed by their energy and even more so by the demonstration of team-based care that was going on there. We had a chance to talk about steps for the future and finding practical approaches to tap into that energy.

I also participated in a panel discussion with primary care leaders from Emory. That event attracted more than 80 students. Immediately after the panel, I was able to give my "Practical Approach to Patient-Centered Medicine" talk. This was a fun and interactive opportunity to engage students about some things that they had not necessarily considered when they began their medical school path. The energy I felt afterward was inspiring.

Many students signed up immediately to receive more information about Primary Care Progress, and they already were talking to faculty about their interest in family medicine and what we do.

Overall, this was an awesome opportunity to talk about the opportunities that exist at Emory. I was able to emphasize team-based education within a large system that has many resources and ways of better integrating family medicine and primary care into the Emory health system. The school has everything in place to be an outstanding leader.

Perhaps one of the most important messages I tried to deliver is the power of cheerful persistence. Even though it was almost an aberrancy to find oneself in family medicine when I started at Emory, it has become an option that students are asking about proactively as they begin their training. I was excited and proud to see what was happening there.

In fact, my medical school classmate Chris Larsen, M.D., D.Phil., is now the school's dean. He attended the Primary Care Progress launch along with another classmate, Rick Agel, M.D. We reminisced about that special time we had together more than three decades ago when we each started on our journeys, and we reflected on where we find ourselves today, working to transform the health care system in this country.

It’s done one school at a time, one system at a time and one community at a time.

Reid Blackwelder, M.D., is Board chair of the AAFP.

Posted at 02:42PM Aug 26, 2015 by Reid Blackwelder, M.D.

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