« Practice Perspective... | Main | Leadership Gives Fem... »

Wednesday Sep 30, 2015

Medical Students, We're Only Looking for the Best

For too long, medical students have heard from their mentors that they are "too smart" for primary care. Family medicine, they’re often told, is a solid safety choice, at best, if they fail to match into a residency program in the specialty they really want.

This misguided narrative, combined with the income gap between family physicians and our subspecialty colleagues, has fueled a worsening shortage of primary care physicians.

Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania AFP
Here I am with members of the Penn State University College of Medicine's family medicine interest group. I talked to medical students all over the country in the past year.

In my year as AAFP president-elect, I traveled the country to chapter meetings, media opportunities, Academy conferences and more. Wherever I went, I worked meetings with students into my schedule so I could give them my perspective on family medicine.

About one-fourth of the nation’s medical students are members of the AAFP, but that impressive statistic hasn’t translated into specialty choice often enough. I wanted to help students understand that family medicine is an exciting, viable career choice that will allow them to make a difference for patients and their families.

During a trip to North Carolina, I visited four medical schools in two days. I talked with students during chapter meetings in places like Arkansas, Kansas and Ohio. I would call med school faculty or chapter staff in advance and say, “I’m going to be in your area. Put me to work.”

Some meetings, however, happened on the fly. During the Family Medicine Congressional Conference in Washington, a family medicine interest group leader reached out and asked if I would come to his med school. So I made room in my schedule, he picked me up in his car, and off I went to spend my birthday with 40 medical students.

I was eager to share my insights about our specialty, but as our discussion got started it became clear to me that many of those students were disinterested and were there simply for a free lunch.

So I told them what I thought about using family medicine as a safety choice.

I said that if you aren’t passionate about your patients, we don’t want you in family medicine.

If you’re in medicine for the money, I said, we don’t want you.

If you won’t be an advocate for your patients, we don’t want you.

In short, I took the tale they’ve been told about family medicine and turned it on its ear. We want the best and brightest because family medicine is not a backup plan. This is a specialty for people who are willing to and capable of learning more than one body system and providing comprehensive care to entire families and, in some cases, entire communities. We deliver babies, provide end-of-life care and so much more in between, performing procedures, providing preventive care, managing chronic conditions and doing it all for both genders and all age groups.  

We talked about the many opportunities in family medicine, highlighting that our members work not only in traditional family medicine practices but also in sports medicine, geriatrics, urgent care facilities, hospitals, academia and more.

I told them about my former resident Bruce Vanderhoff, M.D., a family physician who is a chief medical officer of OhioHealth, a system with more than a dozen hospitals, nine urgent cares, 30 rehabilitation centers and more than two dozen imaging centers.

I told them about family physicians like Richard Wender, M.D., the chief cancer control officer for the American Cancer Society, and about former Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, M.D.

Their stories resonate, and these students had never heard them before. We had a robust question-and-answer session, and by the end, even the students who had initially showed up only for the free food were engaged and asking questions.

In my trips to medical schools this year, I heard from students who thought family physicians earned less -- far less -- than $100,000 a year. They were pleasantly surprised when I directed them to a physician survey that showed family physicians earn, on average, more than $220,000 year. And family physician income is increasing at a faster rate than that of our subspecialty colleagues. We’re slowly closing the gap.

As the Health is Primary(healthisprimary.org) campaign is making clear, family physicians are the solution for what ails American health care. And we need many more of us.

Unfortunately, family physicians have a tendency to not toot our own horns -- even though we do much of the heavy lifting in our health care system. I appreciate humility, but it’s now my job to toot that horn -- or perhaps blare that horn -- not only to students but also to payers, legislators and federal agencies. People, students included, need to know what we do and why it’s important.

Wanda Filer, M.D., M.B.A.,
is president of the AAFP. Her term begins today.

Posted at 07:33AM Sep 30, 2015 by Wanda Filer, M.D.

« Practice Perspective... | Main | Leadership Gives Fem... »

SIGN UP


Subscribe to receive e-mail notifications when the blog is updated.

FEEDS

OUR OTHER AAFP NEWS BLOG

Fresh Perspectives - New Docs in Practice

DISCLAIMER

The opinions and views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent or reflect the opinions and views of the American Academy of Family Physicians. This blog is not intended to provide medical, financial, or legal advice. All comments are moderated and will be removed if they violate our Terms of Use.