Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute Project Winners Hailed

July 01, 2016 10:30 am Chris Crawford

Members of the inaugural class of the AAFP Foundation's Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute, including best project award recipient Michael Lovelace, M.B.A., (top right), collaborate during a program learning session.

The AAFP Foundation has announced the Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute(www.aafpfoundation.org) project award recipients(www.aafpfoundation.org) from its inaugural class.

The program, which was created last year, offers "up and coming" family medicine residents and medical students a yearlong leadership development training opportunity with the goal of expanding the number of well-trained future family medicine leaders.

Thirty scholars (15 residents and 15 medical students) from the 2015 class received $1,000 scholarships to attend the program and the National Conference of Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students in Kansas City, Mo., last year.

These scholars participated in intensive workshops Aug. 1-2 at AAFP headquarters in Leawood, Kan., that focused on three tracks: Policy & Public Health Leadership, Personal & Practice Leadership, and Philanthropic & Mission-driven Leadership.

Story highlights
  • Thirty scholars from the inaugural Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute class received $1,000 scholarships to attend the program and the National Conference of Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students last year.
  • These scholars also participated in intensive workshops Aug. 1-2 at AAFP headquarters in Leawood, Kan., creating projects that focused on three tracks: Policy & Public Health Leadership, Personal & Practice Leadership, and Philanthropic & Mission-driven Leadership.
  • The AAFP Foundation Board of Trustees chose four project award winners from each track to receive an additional $1,000 scholarship for their return to the 2016 National Conference on July 28 to present their projects, as well as three overall best project award winners.

Following the conclusion of the day-and-a-half workshops, scholars were assigned a mentor to work with them on a postconference project based on their respective track of study.

The AAFP Foundation Board of Trustees reviewed these projects, choosing four project award winners (two students and two residents) from each track of study to receive an additional $1,000 scholarship for their return to the 2016 National Conference on July 28 to present their projects.

The three overall best project award winners from each track of study received additional $3,000 scholarships to support their participation in an AAFP or AAFP Foundation national event related to their respective track of study. The three best project award winners were:

  • Melissa Campos, M.D., Policy & Public Health Leadership
  • Christina Kinnevey, M.D., Philanthropic & Mission-driven Leadership
  • Michael Lovelace, M.B.A., Personal & Practice Leadership

Policy & Public Health Leadership Best Project

Campos is a third-year resident at the Scripps Mercy Family Medicine Residency in Chula Vista, Calif., and her project focused on public health advocacy for high-school students from disadvantaged communities.

Campos told AAFP News she took her project to Hoover High School, which is located in an area of San Diego that is largely socioeconomically challenged, and used curriculum from the Stanford Medicine Youth Science Program(smysp.stanford.edu) to create her sessions with 10th-grade students.

She introduced the basics of public health, taught students about community assets and barrier mapping, and explained how to create a public health advocacy project.

"I was able to show the impact of my project with video testimonials from the students," Campos said. "My project helped improve health literacy among the high-school students and fostered leadership in myself and the high-school students in my program."

Campos said she was honored to be part of the program and create her project with the support of the AAFP Foundation.

Best project award recipient Melissa Campos, M.D., enjoys listening to a speaker during the AAFP Foundation's Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute.

"It was amazing to meet all the other participants and talk about their passions within family medicine and their ideas about strengthening the specialty and the communities we serve," she said. "I truly enjoyed being challenged to create a project in my respective track."

Philanthropic & Mission-driven Leadership Best Project

Kinnevey is a third-year resident in the Sutter Health Family Medicine Residency in Davis, Calif., and her project focused on increasing prenatal care in rural Uganda in collaboration with a nonprofit organization that is seeking to increase access to ultrasound imaging technology.

Kinnevey told AAFP News that in many rural areas in Africa, less than half of women receive prenatal care. Consequently, the chance of women in Sub-Saharan Africa dying during childbirth is as high as one in 16, and most rural clinics operate without an ultrasound machine.

"My project involves collaborating with an organization, Rad Impact, which equipped 12 clinics in rural Uganda with ultrasound machines and helped facilitate and fund training to local midwives," she said. "The goal is to not only increase the diagnostic capabilities of these clinics, but also to attract more pregnant women to clinic to receive basic prenatal and primary care."

Best project award recipient Christina Kinnevey, M.D., discusses a project idea with her peers during the AAFP Foundation's Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute.

But it's not enough for these clinics to simply have an ultrasound machine and know how to make a diagnosis, said Kinnevey; the care providers also need to know how to use the diagnosis. So she created a guidebook to answer questions care providers might have when working with these patients.

Furthermore, Kinnevey said she conducted a needs assessment to determine the resources currently available at each of these clinics so she could tailor her guidebook to specific regions.

"The needs assessment revealed that the midwives wanted more training in obstetrical emergencies and care of the newborn immediately postpartum," she said.

So, Kinnevey and her project mentor Sarah Sams, M.D., of Grove City, Ohio, are arranging for a team of physicians to go to Uganda in January to conduct Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics courses and Helping Babies Survive (neonatal resuscitation training) courses for the group of 12 midwives.

"I have had a very rewarding and positive experience as a participant in the inaugural (Emerging Leader Institute) class," she said. "I have long had a passion for doing a project like this, and this program gave me the skills, support and motivation to take it on and make it a reality."

Personal & Practice Leadership Best Project

Lovelace is a third-year medical student at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky, and his project involved building a tool to guide users through the process of creating a budget and help them understand the impact of their decisions on their personal finances. Lovelace's interest in the topic stems from his experience of more than 15 years working in finance before attending medical school.

Most medical students don't take personal finance classes during their undergraduate work or medical school, so they can be overwhelmed when they become residents, Lovelace told AAFP News. Within a few days of matching to a specialty, these students often must decide if they will rent or buy a home, what kind of car they can afford and whether they should begin making loan payments.

Lovelace's tool walks students and residents through a series of 30 to 40 questions related to their projected income, retirement goals, debt, savings goals and estimated monthly expenses. The tool then uses the information provided by the user to create reports with analyses of various expense categories.

For example, the retirement report states whether the user will reach his or her retirement goals based on projected need and retirement contribution, Lovelace said. "For those users who aren't projected to reach their retirement goal, the system will tell them how much additional they need to save," he added.

2016 Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute Scholars Announced

The AAFP Foundation has announced the second class of its Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute for 2016.(www.aafpfoundation.org)

Thirty scholars (15 residents and 15 medical students) from the 2016 class receive $1,000 scholarships to attend the program and the National Conference of Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students in Kansas City, Mo., this July.

"After using the tool, users will have a better understanding of what they can afford, what choices they need to make to reach their retirement goals and, hopefully, more confidence and less anxiety related to their personal finances," Lovelace said. "With this knowledge, future family physicians have the potential to be more financially secure and happier with their financial choices."

In the next few weeks, Lovelace said he's going to record a series of instructional YouTube videos explaining how to use the tool.

Lovelace credited having access to mentors with leadership experience as helping him take his project from concept to reality. "The Emerging Leader Institute gave me the support I needed to build a product that was easy to use but also provides a lot of useful information to the user. I am grateful for the support I received from Marc Matthews, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic, who pushed me to add more functionality to the product, while staying within the scope of the original idea."

Lovelace added that he's excited to present his project at the 2016 National Conference and hopes to positively impact future family physicians across the country.

Project Award Recipients

All project award winners (including the three best project award winners) received $1,000 scholarships to return to the 2016 AAFP National Conference for Family Medicine Residents and Medical Students on July 28 to present their projects. The recipients in each track of study along with their corresponding project information are as follows:

Policy & Public Health Leadership

  • Catherine Coe, M.D., University of North Carolina Family Medicine Residency, Chapel Hill, N.C. -- Increasing undergraduate students' exposure to family medicine
  • Kumba Hinds, M.P.H., Frank H. Netter, M.D., School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Conn. -- Primary care physician adherence to specialist recommendations made through electronic consultations/clinical outcomes for patients whose treatment is guided by electronic consultations
  • Elizabeth McIntosh, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse -- Requiring a family medicine rotation for New York state medical licensure

Personal & Practice Leadership

  • John Bernot, M.D., Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, N.C. -- Technology-driven diabetes management
  • Amanda Cooper, D.O., Christiana Care Family Medicine Residency, Wilmington, Del. -- Got skills? Value through leadership training
  • Alexandra Tee, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Va. -- The role of student "hotspotting" team in primary care practice

Philanthropic & Mission-driven Leadership

  • Emily Barker, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison -- Community awareness of free gynecologic services for uninsured women in Madison: Initial assessment and recommendations for future directions
  • Natalie Gentile, M.D., Department of Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. -- Promoting philanthropic leadership among family medicine residents through the quadruple aim: The role of wellness and self-compassion on civic action
  • Bijan Mossadeghi, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson -- Improved quality of life and access to health care for the homeless through community gardening

The Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute is supported by donations from individual family physicians. To make a donation, visit the AAFP Foundation website(www.aafpfoundation.org) and designate your gift to the Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute.

Related AAFP News Coverage
Family Medicine Leads Emerging Leader Institute Aims to Bolster Specialty's Future
(6/23/2015)