Clinical Preventive Service Recommendation

Dental Caries

Dental Caries, in Children from Birth through Age 5 Years

The AAFP recommends that primary care clinicians prescribe oral fluoride supplementation starting at age 6 months for children whose water supply is deficient in fluoride. (2014)

(Grade: B recommendation)
Grade Definition: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/grades.htm#brec(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
Clinical Considerations: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/dentalprek/dentchfinalrs.htm#consider(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)

The AAFP recommends that primary care clinicians apply fluoride varnish to the primary teeth of all infants and children starting at the age of primary tooth eruption. (2014)

(Grade: B recommendation)
Grade Definition: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/grades.htm#brec(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
Clinical Considerations: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/dentalprek/dentchfinalrs.htm#consider(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)

The AAFP concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine screening examinations for dental caries performed by primary care clinicians in children from birth to age 5 years. (2014)

(Grade: I recommendation)
Grade Definition: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/grades.htm#irec(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)
Clinical Considerations: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/dentalprek/dentchfinalrs.htm#consider(www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org)


These recommendations are provided only as assistance for physicians making clinical decisions regarding the care of their patients. As such, they cannot substitute for the individual judgment brought to each clinical situation by the patient's family physician. As with all clinical reference resources, they reflect the best understanding of the science of medicine at the time of publication, but they should be used with the clear understanding that continued research may result in new knowledge and recommendations. These recommendations are only one element in the complex process of improving the health of America. To be effective, the recommendations must be implemented.