Improving Communication During Office Visits

Study Description and Methods

In a randomized trial, we tested the effectiveness of Ask-Me-3, a patient-physician communication tool. We examined whether Ask-Me-3 changed the content and duration of physician-patient office visits, and assessed the viewpoints of patients, staff, and physicians of the practicality and usability of the program.

Specific Aims and Objectives

The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the "Ask-Me-3" program on physician/patient communication patterns during office visits

Timeline

This project was conducted from April 1, 2004, through March 2005.

Status

This project is currently closed. See below for key findings and publications.

Contact Information

For additional information about this study, please contact:

Brian Manning, MPH, CHES
Associate Research Director
AAFP National Research Network
1-800-274-2237, x3179
bmanning@aafp.org

Presentations

  1. Galliher J, Manning B, Bonham A, Brown J, Dickinson M, Hickner J, Pace W, Post D, and Weiss B. Preliminary Findings From: “Improving Communication During Office Visits” (IC-DOV) Clinical Trial. Presentation at the Pfizer Health Literacy Conference, September 14, 2005, Washington, D.C.
  2. Galliher J, Manning B, Bonham A, Brown J, Dickinson M, Hickner J, Pace W, Post D, and Weiss B. Assessing a Patient Advocacy & Health Communication Intervention in Primary Care: A Report from the AAFP NRN. Presentation at the American Academy of Family Physicians 2005 Scientific Assembly, September 30, 2005, San Francisco, CA.
  3. Bonham A, Manning B, Galliher J, Brown J, Dickinson M, Hickner J, Pace W, Post D, and Weiss B. Patient Advocacy and Health Communication in Primary Care: A Clinical Trial within the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network. Poster presentation at the North American Primary Care Research Group Annual Meeting, October 16, 2005, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
  4. Manning B, Galliher J, Bonham, Brown J, Dickinson M, Hickner J, Pace W, Post D, and Weiss B. “Improving Communication During Office Visits” Clinical Trial: Findings from a Randomized Study Conducted within the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network. Presentation at the Patient Education Conference, November 18, 2005, Orlando, FL.
  5. Manning B, Bonham A, Galliher J, Stewart T, Brown J, Dickinson M., Hickner J, Pace W, Post D, and Weiss B. Relationship between Patient Question Asking and Health Outcomes in a RCT. Poster presentation at the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality National Practice-Based Research Network Research Conference, May 15, 2006, Bethesda, MD.

Key Findings and Publications

In a patient population in which asking questions already occurs at a high rate and levels of adherence are fairly high, we found no evidence that the AM3 intervention results in patients asking specific questions or more questions in general, or in better adherence to prescription medications or lifestyle recommendations.

Access the complete manuscript:

Patient Question-asking During Primary Care Visits: A Report from the AAFP National Research Network(9 page PDF). Galliher JM, Post DM, Weiss BD, et al. Ann Fam Med. 2010;8(2):151-159


This project was funded by a grant from Pfizer, Inc.