Chapter and Residency Program Mini-Grants for Tobacco and Nicotine Prevention and Control

2016-2017 Mini-Grant Recipients

Supported in part by a grant from the AAFP Foundation.

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Questions?

Ashley Poole

Global Population Health Specialist
(800) 274-2237, ext. 3140
apoole@aafp.org

Please note that the submission deadline for 2016-2017 Mini-Grants has passed.

Purpose

The Tobacco and Nicotine Prevention and Control Mini-grant program aims to reduce the harm inflicted on Americans by tobacco and nicotine products. Our goals are to promote prevention and cessation of tobacco and nicotine products, and to eliminate secondhand smoke exposure. A variety of factors influence whether individuals begin and continue to use tobacco and nicotine products, including: clinical interventions, community norms, organizational culture and policies, as well as laws and ordinances. Our intention is that applicants will develop innovative projects that attempt to address tobacco and nicotine prevention and control by addressing clinical practice, social factors, or public policy.

Eligibility

Eligible organizations must be an AAFP Chapter or an ACGME-accredited allopathic or osteopathic family medicine residency program in the United States.

Areas of Focus

Grant proposals must focus on one or more of these areas:

  • Clinical intervention: Developing or implementing office-based tools or processes to identify and reduce the number of people who use tobacco within your patient panel.
  • Community engagement: Collaborating with individuals or organizations in your community to strengthen the community’s capacity and to make smoking culturally unacceptable.
  • Advocacy: Working to strengthen local or state laws and ordinances that will support prevention, cessation and the elimination of secondhand smoke.

2016-2017 Mini-Grant Recipients

The AAFP Tobacco and Nicotine Prevention and Control Chapter/Family Medicine Residency Program Mini-Grants is an annual, customizable mini-grants that awarded $10,000 to the following 5 chapters and family medicine residencies. The following recipients showcased innovative programs that attempt to address tobacco and nicotine prevention and control by addressing clinical practice, social factors, or public policy. The grants were made possible with support from the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation.

Aultman Family Medicine Residency Program (Canton, OH)

Aultman’s Family Medicine Residency Program will provide innovative tobacco cessation intervention through effective evidence-based methods and technology to aid and improve the health of high-risk, underserved patient populations. Medical assistants, nurses and residents will receive education/training in tobacco cessation from motivational interviewing, behavior change and appropriate non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy.

Delaware Academy of Family Physicians

Operating through family medicine residency programs, DAFP will (1) provide tobacco prevention programming for school students via Tar Wars and (2) improve tobacco cessation by training practices how to use a brief, evidence-based cessation intervention and linking patients to community services. Cessation counseling will be tracked in practice EHRs.

Kansas Academy of Family Physicians

Healthcare providers have the ability and strong reputation that can advance health policies, educate decision makers, and increase community engagement. KAFP will partner with Tobacco Free Wichita Coalition’s Medical Advisory Council to increase provider engagement, advance local tobacco control strategies and share lessons learned with other coalitions.

Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians

Tobacco 21 Strike Force will rally family physicians, residents and students as advocates to support and introduce city ordinances and/or statewide legislation to raise the minimum age to 21 for the sale of tobacco products. Raising the tobacco purchase age to 21 will prevent youth tobacco use – and save lives.

New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians

NJAFP will train practices how to (1) use a brief, evidence-based intervention to support cessation and (2) link patients to community services. Cessation counseling and linkages will be tracked in practice EHRs. The project is part of an asthma curriculum for a large learning collaborative in PA and NJ.