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The Role of Dietary Supplements in Filling Nutrient Gaps

Published Research Study from Nutrients provided by Nature Made

Although more than 50% of U.S. adults use dietary supplements, little information is available on the impact of supplement use frequency on nutrient intakes and deficiencies. A recent study published in Nutrients, examines nationally representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) to assess intakes from food alone versus food plus multi-vitamin/multi-mineral supplements of 17 nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement and a Tolerable Upper Intake Level, and of the status of five nutrients with recognized biomarkers of deficiency. The research concludes that among U.S. adults, multi-vitamin/multi-mineral supplement use is associated with decreased micronutrient inadequacies, intakes slightly exceeding the UL for a few nutrients, and a lower risk of nutrient deficiencies. This research was supported by Bayer Consumer Healthcare, DSM and Pharmavite, which are members of the Campaign for Essential Nutrients (CFEN). This information is brought to you by Nature Made.

Published Research Study from Nutrients provided by Nature Made