STEPS

New Drug Reviews

Trifarotene (Aklief) for the Treatment of Acne

 

Am Fam Physician. 2020 Oct 15;102(8):503-504.

Trifarotene (Aklief) is a topical retinoid labeled for the treatment of facial and truncal acne vulgaris in patients nine years and older.1 Similar to other retinoids, its exact mechanism of action is not known, but it may work by normalizing keratinization and by having anti-inflammatory effects through stimulation of retinoic acid receptors.

 Enlarge     Print

DrugDosageDose formCost*

Trifarotene (Aklief)

One pump actuation for face Two pump actuations for upper trunk, one additional pump for middle and lower back, if needed

45-g actuation pump; 0.005% strength

$550


*—Estimated lowest GoodRx price for one pump. Actual cost will vary with insurance and by region. Information obtained at https://www.goodrx.com (accessed September 1, 2020; zip code: 66211).

DrugDosageDose formCost*

Trifarotene (Aklief)

One pump actuation for face Two pump actuations for upper trunk, one additional pump for middle and lower back, if needed

45-g actuation pump; 0.005% strength

$550


*—Estimated lowest GoodRx price for one pump. Actual cost will vary with insurance and by region. Information obtained at https://www.goodrx.com (accessed September 1, 2020; zip code: 66211).

Safety

Trifarotene has not been shown to have serious adverse effects. When used during pregnancy, systemic retinoid therapy is teratogenic. Topical use of trifarotene has low systemic exposure, and limited data show there are no adverse fetal or maternal outcomes.1 There are no data on the presence of trifarotene in human breast milk or its effects on breastfed infants or milk production. Breastfeeding mothers should minimize potential exposure to the infant by using trifarotene on the smallest area of the skin away from the nipple and areola, and for the shortest duration possible.1

Tolerability

Trifarotene is generally well tolerated when used on the face and trunk. Erythema, scaling, dryness, and stinging will be reported by about one-third of users after one week of treatment, but it will not be severe in most cases.1 These effects peak within the first four weeks of treatment, after which symptoms begin to decline.1 While using trifarotene, patients should apply a moisturizer, minimize exposure to ultraviolet rays, and wear sunscreen and protective clothing over treated areas to lessen irritation.1

Effectiveness

Trifarotene has been studied in two 12-week, randomized, double-blind trials with a total of 2,420 patients

Address correspondence to Amimi Osayande, MD, FAAFP, at amimi.osayande@northside.com. Reprints are not available from the authors.

Author disclosure: No relevant financial affiliations.

References

show all references

1. DailyMed. Drug label information. Aklief—trifarotene cream. Updated October 4, 2019. Accessed June 13, 2020. https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=62d910db-85a6-4696-b69b-4bd2f3080cfc...

2. Tan J, Thiboutot D, Popp G, et al. Randomized phase 3 evaluation of trifarotene 50 μg/g cream treatment of moderate facial and truncal acne. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019;80(6):1691–1699.

3. Eichenfield LF, Jarratt M, Schlessinger J, et al.; Adapalene Lotion Study Group. Adapalene 0.1% lotion in the treatment of acne vulgaris: results from two placebo-controlled, multicenter, randomized double-blind, clinical studies. J Drugs Dermatol. 2010;9(6):639–646.

4. Yang Z, Zhang Y, Mosler EL, et al. Topical benzoyl peroxide for acne. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020;3(3): CD011154.

5. Blume-Peytavi U, Fowler J, Kemény L, et al. Long-term safety and efficacy of trifarotene 50 μg/g cream, a first-in-class RAR-γ selective topical retinoid, in patients with moderate facial and truncal acne. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2020;34(1):166–173.

STEPS new drug reviews cover Safety, Tolerability, Effectiveness, Price, and Simplicity. Each independent review is provided by authors who have no financial association with the drug manufacturer.

This series is coordinated by Allen F. Shaughnessy, PharmD, MMedEd, assistant medical editor.

A collection of STEPS published in AFP is available at https://www.aafp.org/afp/steps.

 

 

Copyright © 2020 by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
This content is owned by the AAFP. A person viewing it online may make one printout of the material and may use that printout only for his or her personal, non-commercial reference. This material may not otherwise be downloaded, copied, printed, stored, transmitted or reproduced in any medium, whether now known or later invented, except as authorized in writing by the AAFP. Contact afpserv@aafp.org for copyright questions and/or permission requests.

Want to use this article elsewhere? Get Permissions

CME Quiz

More in AFP


Editor's Collections


Related Content


More in Pubmed

MOST RECENT ISSUE


Nov 15, 2020

Access the latest issue of American Family Physician

Read the Issue


Email Alerts

Don't miss a single issue. Sign up for the free AFP email table of contents.

Sign Up Now

Navigate this Article