AFP DEPARTMENT COLLECTION

POEMs

POEMs (Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters) are summaries of research that is relevant to physicians and their patients and meet three criteria: address a question that primary care physicians face in day-to-day practice; measure outcomes important to physicians and patients, including symptoms, morbidity, quality of life, and mortality; and have the potential to change the way physicians practice.

May 15, 2019 Issue
Limited Data: Deprescribing is Safe, But at the Risk of Symptom Recurrence
The limited rigorous data on deprescribing suggest that many patients can safely stop unnecessary medication, but symptom relapse is significant.


May 15, 2019 Issue
FIT Has Similar Yield as Colonoscopy for Colorectal Cancer and Advanced Adenoma Over 10 Years
Over a 10-year period, the rates of detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced adenomas using FIT are similar to those seen in studies of screening colonoscopy. This does not prove that FIT reduces morbidity and mortality due to CRC as effectively as colonoscopy.


May 15, 2019 Issue
Simple Clinical Prediction Rule Determines Risk of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction
A simple clinical prediction rule using noninvasive data can identify patients at low, moderate, and high risk for HFPEF.


May 15, 2019 Issue
Risk of GI Bleeding Highest with Rivaroxaban, Lower with Apixaban, and Lowest with PPI Cotherapy
Among patients using oral anticoagulants alone, the risk of hospitalization for upper GI tract bleeding is highest with rivaroxaban (Xarelto) and lowest with apixaban (Eliquis).


Apr 1, 2019 Issue
Statins Ineffective for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients 75 Years or Older Without Diabetes Mellitus
In this retrospective study, statin treatment in patients 75 years or older without preexisting CVD did not change the likelihood of developing CVD or reduce any-cause mortality. However, patients 75 to 84 years of age with diabetes mellitus benefitted from treatment. These results support the results from the ALLHAT study.


Apr 1, 2019 Issue
Aspirin’s Benefits and Harms Are Less Clear for Primary Prevention in Moderate-Risk Patients
In this study, after five years of treatment, patients at a moderate risk of heart disease who took low-dose aspirin did not show a decrease in coronary events and all-cause mortality and had slightly more gastrointestinal bleeding.


Apr 1, 2019 Issue
No Reduction in Delirium with the Use of Haloperidol or Ziprasidone in Critically Ill Patients
For patients with acute respiratory failure or shock who develop delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU), the use of haloperidol or ziprasidone (Geodon) does not reduce the duration of delirium. This trial was powered to detect at least a two-day difference in the duration of delirium, so a smaller difference cannot be excluded.


Apr 1, 2019 Issue
Guideline, with No Evidence, Suggests Annual Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women
The goal of screening is to identify a disorder before it becomes symptomatic if early treatment has the potential for greater benefit than waiting until symptoms are reported. Despite the failure to meet this definition, this guideline suggests annual screening of women for urinary incontinence and the effect, if any, on their lives.


Mar 15, 2019 Issue
Lorcaserin Is Safe, But Only Modestly Effective for Weight Loss
Lorcaserin, 10 mg twice daily, helps some patients lose 10% or more of their body weight (number needed to treat [NNT] = 10) and appears to be safe in terms of cardiovascular events.


Mar 15, 2019 Issue
Aspirin Plus a High-Dose PPI Prevents Death and Progression in Patients with Barrett Esophagus
In this study, patients with Barrett esophagus were less likely to die or develop esophageal cancer or high-grade dysplasia if they took high-dose esomeprazole (Nexium) alone or in combination with aspirin.


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